Generation Terrorists » Forum
Sign up   |   Start new thread   |   Lost password?   |   Edit profile   |   Member List   |   myGT   |   Blog
Keyword
From
To
 

X-mas Greetings
Howitzer Posted: Sat Dec 6 21:22:21 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS,
HE LIVED ALL ALONE,
IN A ONE BEDROOM HOUSE MADE OF
PLASTER AND STONE.

I HAD COME DOWN THE CHIMNEY
WITH PRESENTS TO GIVE,
AND TO SEE JUST WHO
IN THIS HOME DID LIVE.
I LOOKED ALL ABOUT,
A STRANGE SIGHT I DID SEE,
NO TINSEL, NO PRESENTS,
NOT EVEN A TREE.
NO STOCKING BY MANTLE,
JUST BOOTS FILLED WITH SAND,
ON THE WALL HUNG PICTURES
OF FAR DISTANT LANDS.


WITH MEDALS AND BADGES,
AWARDS OF ALL KINDS,
A SOBER THOUGHT
CAME THROUGH MY MIND.


FOR THIS HOUSE WAS DIFFERENT,
IT WAS DARK AND DREARY,
I FOUND THE HOME OF A SOLDIER,
ONCE I COULD SEE CLEARLY.


THE SOLDIER LAY SLEEPING,
SILENT, ALONE,
CURLED UP ON THE FLOOR
IN THIS ONE BEDROOM HOME.


THE FACE WAS SO GENTLE,
THE ROOM IN SUCH DISORDER,
NOT HOW I PICTURED
A UNITED STATES SOLDIER.

WAS THIS THE HERO
OF WHOM I'D JUST READ?
CURLED UP ON A PONCHO,
THE FLOOR FOR A BED?


I REALIZED THE FAMILIES
THAT I SAW THIS NIGHT,
OWED THEIR LIVES TO THESE SOLDIERS
WHO WERE WILLING TO FIGHT.

SOON ROUND THE WORLD,
THE CHILDREN WOULD PLAY,
AND GROWNUPS WOULD CELEBRATE
A BRIGHT CHRISTMAS DAY.
THEY ALL ENJOYED FREEDOM
EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR,
BECAUSE OF THE SOLDIERS,
LIKE THE ONE LYING HERE.

I COULDN'T HELP WONDER
HOW MANY LAY ALONE,
ON A COLD CHRISTMAS EVE
IN A LAND FAR FROM HOME.


THE VERY THOUGHT
BROUGHT A TEAR TO MY EYE,
I DROPPED TO MY KNEES
AND STARTED TO CRY.


THE SOLDIER AWAKENED
AND I HEARD A ROUGH VOICE,
"SANTA DON'T CRY,
THIS LIFE IS MY CHOICE;


I FIGHT FOR FREEDOM,
I DON'T ASK FOR MORE,
MY LIFE IS MY GOD,
MY COUNTRY, MY CORPS."




THE SOLDIER ROLLED OVER
AND DRIFTED TO SLEEP,
I COULDN'T CONTROL IT,
I CONTINUED TO WEEP.


I KEPT WATCH FOR HOURS,
SO SILENT AND STILL
AND WE BOTH SHIVERED
FROM THE COLD NIGHT'S CHILL.


I DIDN'T WANT TO LEAVE
ON THAT COLD, DARK, NIGHT,
THIS GUARDIAN OF HONOR
SO WILLING TO FIGHT.


THEN THE SOLDIER ROLLED OVER,
WITH A VOICE SOFT AND PURE,
WHISPERED, "CARRY ON SANTA,
IT'S CHRISTMAS DAY, ALL IS SECURE."

ONE LOOK AT MY WATCH,
AND I KNEW HE WAS RIGHT.
"MERRY CHRISTMAS MY FRIEND,
AND TO ALL A GOOD NIGHT."


 
Howitzer Posted: Sat Dec 6 21:24:03 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  THE MILITARY MAN
The average age of the military man is 19 years. He is a short haired,
tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society
as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a
beer, but old enough to die for his country. He never really cared much for
work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his father's; but he has
never collected unemployment either.



He's a recent High School graduate; he was probably an average student,
pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has
a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to
be waiting when he returns from half a world away. He listens to rock and
roll or hip-hop or rap or jazz or swing and 155mm howitzer. He is 10 or 15
pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or
fighting from before dawn to well after dusk.

He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can
field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the
dark. He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade
launcher and use either one effectively if he must. He digs foxholes and
latrines and can apply first aid like a professional. He can march until he
is told to stop or stop until he is told to march.




He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without
spirit or individual dignity. He is self-sufficient. He has two sets of
fatigues: he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and
his feet dry. He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean
his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own
hurts. If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you are hungry,
his food. He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle
when you run low.

He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were
his hands. He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job. He
will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay and still find
ironic humor in it all. He has seen more suffering and death then he should
have in his short lifetime.



He has stood atop mountains of dead bodies, and helped to create them. He
has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and
is unashamed. He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate through
his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to
'square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their
hat, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from
home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.

Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-grandfather, he is paying
the price for our freedom. Beardless or not, he is not a boy. He is the
American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.




He has asked nothing in return, except our friendship and understanding.
Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his
blood. And now we even have women over there in danger, doing their part in
this tradition of going to War when our nation calls us to do so. As you go
to bed tonight, remember this shot.. A short lull, a little shade and a
picture of loved ones in their helmets.




 
Howitzer Posted: Sat Dec 6 21:25:58 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Both of these stories have been stories of my family and thousands of others. One day, I too will be the soldier, and these two passages have really hit home.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Dec 6 22:20:27 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  well done howitzer, i have both of these along with a few others in my keeper file but have resisted posting them here, because i knew they would probably not have been received too well by most of the gt'ers. not a lot of sympathy to be found for the military in this forum.
i too come from a military family and served in the navy back in the 70's, and am very proud of my service.


 
addi Posted: Sun Dec 7 10:02:46 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  There's a flaw in your reasoning gentlemen. You oversimplify, make it us against them, black and white, and then come to your conclusions on the rest of us based on those false premises. Don't fret about it though, you're in good company with all the other millions of liberal and moderate hating conservatives out there.

I'll state it as simply as I can, without sounding condecending.

My brother fought in Nam. My nephew is currently in the Marines. I have nothing but RESPECT for our service men and women who are forced to put their lives on the line every day.

I don't like our current administration. I have serious doubts about the choices Bush has made on foreign policy. I still believe the ramifications of our Iraq invasion weren't fully thought out.

My frequent dissing of republican policies is recorded here on past threads. Not ONE of them ever says anything negative about our soldiers. A jump in logic has been made however that if addi slams Bush and company he must not respect out servicemen. On a larger scale conservatives do this with any liberal that comes out and voices doubts about this administration. If we are against Mr. Bush we are therefore unpatriotic and must not support our soldiers.

IMPORTANT: I am against republican policy on the Iraq war. I am in full support of our servicemen.

I know this must blow your mind and it's difficult to comprehend, but it's true. So howi, post away about how we need to appreciate our soldiers. You will never see a discenting post from me in response. Post away on the wonderful job our pres is doing, or how evil the liberals are for questioning our policies and I will be first in line to jump all over your opinions.



 
Howitzer Posted: Sun Dec 7 11:47:37 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Addison, i know this. It is the "Support our troops, not the war". I have never had any beef with that. I was just stating that we should remember our servicemen, no matter what, because it is not they who chose to go to war. it is the soldiers who are at war now, even if some think it is for a bogus reason, who should always be thanked for thier selfless service and sacrifice to our country. Especially those with families that they will not be seeing during the holidays (just about all of them).

However, hif IS right that some of my military posts on the service, not the policies, have been negitively received. but that is besides the point, i was just trying to share two interesting articles that touched me.


 
addi Posted: Sun Dec 7 12:46:10 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Howitzer said:

>However, hif IS right that some of my military posts on the service, not the policies, have been negitively received. but that is besides the point, i was just trying to share two interesting articles that touched me.

Gotcha Howi. My overwordy post wasn't a slam on your ode to our servicemen. It was a reaction to most GTers being viewed as liberal and therefore "anti-servicemen". i went into rant mode because I hate my bashing of republicans being equated with bashing our soldiers. To me there's a major distinction between the two that many fail to see, on the radio, in the press, and on GT.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sun Dec 7 14:09:23 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>Howitzer said:
>Gotcha Howi. My overwordy post wasn't a slam on your ode to our servicemen. It was a reaction to most GTers being viewed as liberal and therefore "anti-servicemen". i went into rant mode because I hate my bashing of republicans being equated with bashing our soldiers. To me there's a major distinction between the two that many fail to see, on the radio, in the press, and on GT.

addie, my post was not directed at you because i know that you do not disrespect our military. it was mainly directed at others who were here before you that cannot see a distinction between american policy and american military.
furthermore it was not a slam against them, but just an observation on my part.
i would however, like to make one small correction to your post above.
none of our soldiers are forced to put their lives on the line every day. our military is 100% volunteer. of course you knew that, but probably a lot of people in other countries were not aware of that fact.

in any event, happy holidays to all gt'ers !


 
addi Posted: Sun Dec 7 14:29:47 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:

>addie, my post was not directed at you because i know that you do not disrespect our military.

Gotcha hif. There I go again gettin' all "sincere" and stuff. I'm sure Sailovzi and Sweet are having another good laugh

>i would however, like to make one small correction to your post above.
>none of our soldiers are forced to put their lives on the line every day. our military is 100% volunteer. of course you knew that, but probably a lot of people in other countries were not aware of that fact.

I understand the distinction and it's a valid point. Would just add to be nitpicky that citizens here volunteer to join our armed forces. Once in though they are "forced" to go where da man tells them to go. If they're in Bagdad facing the very real threat of being killed tomorrow by a road bomb it wasn't because they really had a choice in the matter.

>in any event, happy holidays to all gt'ers !

Right back at ya. (hope you've pulled your special holiday mistletoe thong out for the season)


 
iggy Posted: Mon Dec 8 03:55:18 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  respect the men in uniform.

they're the ones that guard u while u sleep at night.

i know how it feels. ant too.

here's to all them men in combat greens.

CPL (NS) Chu
Company Medic
Bravo Coy, 1 SIR.
621 SIR reserves.


 
antartica Posted: Mon Dec 8 12:47:37 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  this is my fave army song...

Purple light, in the valley,
That is where, I want to be,
Infantry, close companions,
With my rifle, and my buddy and me.

Booking out, see my girlfriend.
Saw her with another man.
Heartbroken, back to Army.
With my rifle and my buddy and me.

ROD, back to study.
Got degree, so happy.
Can't forget, days in Army
With my rifle and my buddy and me.

Purple light, at the front line.
That is where, my buddy died.
If I die..would you bury me.
With my rifle and my buddy and me.


CPL(NS)Ian Lai
Battalion Casualty Station (BCS) Medic
HQ Coy, 3rd Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment



when i became a medic in the Singapore Armed Forces, we were given a pep talk by our School Sergeant Major... all i could remember from his hour long talk was "Once a Medic... Always a Medic". Then I was like "Bah HUMBUG! Lemme serve my time and get on with my life."

I could not have been more wrong... when I was in the field when my friends and colleagues got sick and injured, I was their best friend.... in fact, only friend. Other than being just another infantry grunt i was their "doctor"... their life line. In fact this is what we are called in the forces here. The Life Line of the Field...




Seek, Save, Serve . . . . . . . no one can take that away from me.

it's not the badge you wear on your arm... it's the badge you wear in your heart.



 
antartica Posted: Mon Dec 8 13:05:14 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Howitzer said:
>Both of these stories have been stories of my family and thousands of others. One day, I too will be the soldier, and these two passages have really hit home.

you go man...now i think i finally know y your handle "Howitzer" =)


 
antartica Posted: Mon Dec 8 13:06:51 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  how many of you remember our GT bro Casper...

have not heard from him in a looonnnng time...

hope you're home and well my friend......


 
mat_j Posted: Tue Dec 9 08:44:03 2003 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Here here to the men in the uniform. Four generations of my family have worn the uniform. My great grandfather at the Somme, My Grandfather in Gibralter and Italy, my father in Cyprus, Libya and the Suez and a cousin in the Falklands.
They wore those uniforms so i didn't have to


 



[ Reply to this thread ] [ Start new thread ]