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What is the Status of my Daughter ?
ifihadahif Posted: Mon May 10 09:03:56 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Not trying to make a point, just thought you guys might find this interesting:


What's the status of my daughter?
Mike S. Adams


May 10, 2004

Since I wrote my last column, I have had a busy week. I began the week with a lecture at Yale Law School, which will soon be aired on CSPAN. That lecture was followed by an exciting exchange with brilliant law students offering insights from both sides of the political spectrum.

Although exciting, I was disappointed with one portion of the exchange, which occurred while a student was questioning my motivation for seeking to abolish speech codes on college campuses. During the exchange, he suggested that I was not concerned about hate crimes like the one involving Matthew Shepard several years ago in Wyoming.

The subject of hate crimes came up again on Thursday shortly after I finished a lecture at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. The context was a radio interview, which was followed by a brief question and answer session with listeners calling in to comment on the interview. One caller made the assertion that conservatives never suffer discrimination on campuses unless they engage in “hate speech” likely to result in hate crimes against members of marginalized groups. When pressed for an example of such speech, the caller fabricated an example by misquoting a case I reported on a couple of months ago.

During both of those exchanges, I wanted to talk about the actual frequency of “hate crimes” in our society, touching on crimes motivated by factors such as sexual orientation, religion, and race. I decided to shy away from the topic, largely because of the racial aspect of the argument.

In my experience, quoting statistics about the prevalence of black-on-white crime in America is usually a bad idea after the opposing party has started to levy charges of “insensitivity.” While it is true that there are about eight black-on-white crimes of violence for every white-on-black crime of violence in America, quoting that statistic rarely motivates people to honestly consider black racism. In fact, if you are white and quote the statistic, you will probably be accused of racism. If you are black and quote the statistic, you will probably be labeled an “Uncle Tom.”

When I returned home from Washington, I had almost forgotten about “hate speech” and “hate crimes.” I was just looking forward to spending a quiet weekend at home with my wife. When I asked her if there was any interesting news while I was out of town, she informed me that on Wednesday the first murder of a UNCW student had occurred on our campus. The student, Jessica Faulkner, had been killed in one of the dormitories.

Shortly thereafter, a UNCW student named Curtis Dixon was arrested and charged with her murder. He was also charged with raping and kidnapping her. Given that the suspect is black and the victim was white, I knew immediately that I would be hearing more on the subject of inter-racial crime and “hate crimes” in the near future. Indeed, the very next day several people cynically asked me whether there was any chance that Dixon would be charged with a “hate crime.” Their cynicism suggests that such charges are solely reserved for cases where whites are accused of murdering blacks.

On the issue of motivation, the university was very quick to inform the media that there was no history of tension between the two students. They also claimed that they had experienced no difficulties with the accused. However, after hearing those statements from the administration, I have had the opportunity to read the transcript of the 911 call that the victim’s father placed after the suspect allegedly called him to boast of killing his daughter. That call was made to a New Hanover County police dispatcher after some apparent difficulties in getting information from the campus police. Important portions of that transcript follow:

Faulkner: "Hi, my name is John Faulkner. My daughter is a student at UNC- Wilmington. She's in the learning community dormitory there. I just got a phone call from one of her classmates that said he murdered her."

Dispatcher: "Murdered her?"

Faulkner: "Yes, murdered her."

***
Dispatcher: "Have you contacted UNCW police?"

Faulkner: "I have, twice. These people aren't moving too quickly on this."

***
Faulkner: "The campus police said they have people in the area looking for a suspect. I could give a damn about a suspect. I want to know what's the status of my daughter."

Dispatcher: "Where is your daughter supposed to be right now?"

Faulkner: "She should be in her dormitory packing up to leave and come home for the summer."

***

Dispatcher: "Have you received death threats?"

Faulkner: "No. She's had a boy stalking her around for quite a long time, and we thought that had gone by the wayside, but he's evidently pretty serious."

Dispatcher: "Was it a previous boyfriend who made threats to you?"

Faulkner: "He was not a boyfriend. He was just a fellow student. He called here this morning. He basically wanted to date my daughter and she refused to date him, and now he basically called this morning and said he murdered her. "

This is a tragic case that will undoubtedly provoke a lot of emotional debate on our campus and in our community. If an indictment comes down for all of the crimes Dixon is charged with committing, the death penalty is likely to be sought. If that happens, campus debate on capital punishment will be intense.

If the death penalty is not sought, many will be talking instead about hate crime penalty enhancement simply because the alleged crime is inter-racial. That discussion will be expanded if the accusations of stalking have merit.

Before the broader issues of crime and punishment are broached, the university community must know whether this student was being stalked. If she was, did the university know about it? If they did, what measures did they take to deal with the problem?

To be continued.

Mike Adams (adams_mike@hotmail.com) is an associate professor at UNC-Wilmington. He is author of the book “Welcome to the Ivory Tower of Babel.”



©2004 Mike S. Adams





 
DanSRose Posted: Mon May 10 09:26:46 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Why is this a hate crime? This is a failure to act on the poorly trained university police, not a black-on-white or white-on-black issue.
Of course there is hate in the nature of crime. In all rapes there is an nature of hate, but that is not what makes it a hate crime. "Hate crime" is a misnomer- it should read "racial motivated crime of hate", but that's too long.


 
marsteller Posted: Mon May 10 11:38:20 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  per capita, black people commit more violent crimes than whites. i don't think it's an inherent black trait, just that people are products of their environments and such...


 
simonvii Posted: Mon May 10 12:17:33 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  marsteller said:
>per capita, black people commit more violent crimes than whites. i don't think it's an inherent black trait, just that people are products of their environments and such...

i agree, however it is interesting that the U.S. is only 12% black as opposed to over 80% white, and yet blacks commit 8 times as many violent crimes


 
FN Posted: Mon May 10 12:47:34 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Big debates over here as well about immigration and stuff like that.


 
libra Posted: Mon May 10 13:44:14 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  This doesn't have a whole lot to do with this, but its an interesting aside.
we talked in my soc class today that race isn't really the issue, its class. But race is used to cover up class because in a Democratic system, we're not really supposed to have classes the way we do...


 
casper Posted: Mon May 10 15:18:22 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>This doesn't have a whole lot to do with this, but its an interesting aside.
>we talked in my soc class today that race isn't really the issue, its class. But race is used to cover up class because in a Democratic system, we're not really supposed to have classes the way we do...

we have class? i've been told on numerous occcasion that i have no class...


 
Mark Posted: Mon May 10 16:18:38 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>This doesn't have a whole lot to do with this, but its an interesting aside.
>we talked in my soc class today that race isn't really the issue, its class. But race is used to cover up class because in a Democratic system, we're not really supposed to have classes the way we do...
(The next is based on my view living in Holland, but might count for other countries too.) Too bad, we do have classes. This is has only partly to do with a Democratic system. We also live in a capitalistic system, a free market system so to speak. It is there to create compitition between companies, making a better living for everyone, making everybody wealthy. It just isn't working. Now to find the solution...That cannot be found yet. We will need to change ourselfs and really care about eachother. Really wanting that we are all the same. Become one big united herd.


 
marsteller Posted: Mon May 10 16:59:13 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>we talked in my soc class today that race isn't really the issue, its class. But race is used to cover up class because in a Democratic system, we're not really supposed to have classes the way we do...

the lines of race and class are drawn largely parallel here in the NY area. im not saying it's right, but it's a rare thing to see a black man driving a mercedes through my upper-class suburban area, and a rare thing to see some honkey bastard drivin his '86 buick regal through the ghettos of the city.


 
Asswipe Posted: Mon May 10 17:11:10 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>This doesn't have a whole lot to do with this, but its an interesting aside.
>we talked in my soc class today that race isn't really the issue, its class. But race is used to cover up class because in a Democratic system, we're not really supposed to have classes the way we do...

where does it say that we're not supposed to have classes? democracy is not an economical system.


 
addi Posted: Mon May 10 17:50:53 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  one of the ideals and principles of american democracy is the equality of all. It's just an ideal worth striving for though, and obviously in practice human nature takes over and makes defining classes in our society (ask all the ex-communists how classless their system was). American Capitalism comes along and gives it another little nudge in that direction by saying if you're white it's easier to become rich; if you're rich it's easier to to be at the top of our "classless" democracy. (Chris Rock does a good job explaining this in his latest HBO special).

Thats pecisely why after some 500 years of being treated as second class citizens here you don't see a lot of blacks driving new benzs in affluent neighborhoods, unless they're professional atheletes. It's getting better, but we are still dealing with remenants of the slave mentality, and racial superiority issues. the pessimist in me says, like Jesus said of the poor, that it (discrimination) will always be around.

now if you see it as a genetic difference, and that intelligence wise, blacks aren't capable of handling the executive type business positions (or quarterbacking in the NFL) then that's a whole nuther point, but I know of some exclusive groups still around in Mississippi and southern Georgia that would love to have you as a member.


 
Christian Posted: Mon May 10 18:14:46 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  variety is the spice of life?


 
Asswipe Posted: Mon May 10 19:25:51 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>one of the ideals and principles of american democracy is the equality of all. It's just an ideal worth striving for though, and obviously in practice human nature takes over and makes defining classes in our society (ask all the ex-communists how classless their system was). American Capitalism comes along and gives it another little nudge in that direction by saying if you're white it's easier to become rich; if you're rich it's easier to to be at the top of our "classless" democracy. (Chris Rock does a good job explaining this in his latest HBO special).

equality under the law and an equal vote, yes, but no where in the constitution is equality of property mentioned as a right. capitalism and democracy are not synonyms.

i watched 20 minutes of chris rock's latest HBO special and turned it off. he didn't have a single new topic or view, i mean, the man was still talking about OJ. i didn't see the part you're referring to but i'd be suprised if it didn't suck.

are you saying skin color benefits/hinders us moreso than the economic group we're born into?




 
addi Posted: Mon May 10 20:13:13 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:

> capitalism and democracy are not synonyms.

of course they aren't. one is a system of government and the other is an economic system. I never meant to imply the two were the same. I was only trying to make the point that inequality exists in a democracy, and capitalism does nothing to squelch the class divisions.

>i watched 20 minutes of chris rock's latest HBO special and turned it off.

geez, if you turned it off after 20 minutes it must have sucked. I'm really embarrassed i watched the whole thing.
I only mentioned it because he talked about the difference between being wealthly and being rich, but you would have had to have seen it : )

>are you saying skin color benefits/hinders us moreso than the economic group we're born into?

in nutshell all i was saying is that economic discrimination still exists today in the U.S. (yes even in a red,white, and blue democracy). All other things being equal, the color of one's skin does play a role in whether your path to driving a benz in an affluent neighborhood is beset with a few or with many obsticles.

to varying degrees people still determine many things about the character of a persons personality from their skin color.


 



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