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Zacq Posted: Wed May 19 16:16:49 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://www.saint-andre.com/journal/2003-09-03.html

I found this a while ago and am having trouble thinking of anything bad about the plan.


 
Mark Posted: Wed May 19 16:46:34 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  To start a bit off topic. One must realize that true communism was never achieved in any country. One of the base rules of communism is that the government will eventually disappear and companies are in the hands of the people. He is reffering to Lenism (Russia) or stuff like that.

Ok, to go a bit more on topic:
I guess that his main flaw is his opinion with the poor. I guess his view is based on an american society... don't really know much about it. But my situation: My parents aren't the richest people... to be honest, we're quite poor (relativly speaking). The costs for giving childeren a change to go to school are huge. Now that I'm old enough to work, I've chosen to pay my school for myself, so my parents won't have to do that anymore. This actually is illigal here, they are "forced" by the law to pay for me, or at least support me a great deal, which they don't (my own choice). Here, parent will need to support there childeren till they're 21... which is only 12 days away for me.

As long as I couldn't work, couldn't pay for myself, my parents needed to work hard to support me and my brother. And imho a system as he describes will make things cost more.


 
Zacq Posted: Wed May 19 16:50:59 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Wolffie said:

>As long as I couldn't work, couldn't pay for myself, my parents needed to work hard to support me and my brother. And imho a system as he describes will make things cost more.

But what he's saying is that school's will have to compete, so the prices can't be that high. And much of the money goes to administrators that would no longer be necessary.


 
FN Posted: Wed May 19 17:21:50 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Something off topic but I just read somewhere that after Vietnam studies were done to find out why so many people had volunteered to fight in a country on the other side of the world which they had no connection to whatsoever.

Results showed that vast numbers among them thought Vietnam bordered with the US, so they thought they were going to defend the national borders.

The reason for this was supposedly concluded to be the modular schoolsystem which caused subjects like geography and history to be ignored most of the time.



Very weird.


 
casper Posted: Wed May 19 17:34:23 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:
>Wolffie said:
>
>>As long as I couldn't work, couldn't pay for myself, my parents needed to work hard to support me and my brother. And imho a system as he describes will make things cost more.
>
>But what he's saying is that school's will have to compete, so the prices can't be that high. And much of the money goes to administrators that would no longer be necessary.

wouldn't you still have to have some sort of regulatory staff that goes around and ensures that these teachers really are teaching kids the things they are supposed to learn? the way he's talking about setting it up it'd almost be like an apprenticeship program. if there's no standarized regulation on what these people have to be taught then why have them go to school anyways? why not just send them to the library and save yourself the money


 
Zacq Posted: Wed May 19 17:42:08 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  casper said:

>wouldn't you still have to have some sort of regulatory staff that goes around and ensures that these teachers really are teaching kids the things they are supposed to learn? the way he's talking about setting it up it'd almost be like an apprenticeship program. if there's no standarized regulation on what these people have to be taught then why have them go to school anyways? why not just send them to the library and save yourself the money

There would be some key administrators to help run the schools. There would be some regulation of curriculums, because there would still be companies that make the math books and etc... I've grown to know and love. And colleges wouldn't stop using SATs so that would have to be learned. But there would still be a lot more freedom for schools to teach stuff that matters.


 
Kira Posted: Wed May 19 19:42:37 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I was a little confused by his version of how schools would change after being surrendered to the private sector. He sometimes said 'non-profit organization' and at other times said 'competition' as in business. I believe we would see a lot of both, but it was unclear what he was seeing.

It's a nice article for its length, although it could have stood to go into a bit more detail about certain points. I suggest you check out http://honested.com/ which is so packed with essays and junk about the seperation of school and state that I just said screw it and linked the front page. :P

On a creative note, the shoe analogy was totally useless.


 
FN Posted: Wed May 19 19:48:41 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Something I picked up from that site:



The "Three R's"

Many parents believe that the core of "education" is primarily learning the Three R's: Readin', Writin', and 'Rithmatic.



RRitin'?

Wtf.



I don't believe in seperation of school and state. I think it is important that everybody gets at least some level of education and at least knows a bit of the basics.

If you rule out the more or less standard level of education things will get fucked up.

Rich people will get to go to good schools, which might sound good at first but when you can't find any good and skilled workers or researchers that won't be of much use to you either.


Hurray for the Belgian schoolsystem, I hope they'll keep it the way it is right now.


 
Kira Posted: Wed May 19 20:21:06 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>>RRitin'?
>
>Wtf.
>
>
I'm not too enthusiastic about the front page article, although not because it mentions the oh-so-old phrase 'The Three R's.' I hope you check out some of the other essays.

>
>I don't believe in seperation of school and state. I think it is important that everybody gets at least some level of education and at least knows a bit of the basics.
>
>If you rule out the more or less standard level of education things will get fucked up.

The seperation of school and state would not be the end of education. People were learning the basics long before they were tax-funded, and they know that they don't stand much of a chance at life without it. You get a sense of this at a young age, and your parents know it right from the start.

>
>Rich people will get to go to good schools, which might sound good at first but when you can't find any good and skilled workers or researchers that won't be of much use to you either.

Why is wealthy people going to good schools going to deprive us of workers and researchers? Please explain.


 
Mark Posted: Thu May 20 04:33:56 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:

>But what he's saying is that school's will have to compete, so the prices can't be that high. And much of the money goes to administrators that would no longer be necessary.
So...they must compete, just like in our free market economy. The prices can't be high? Well, they can be. The theory of free market economy is that by competing the prices remain low... It ain't really working imo. And I don't think it will work for schools either.


 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 05:38:30 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sailovzi said:
> People were learning the basics long before they were tax-funded, and they know that they don't stand much of a chance at life without it. You get a sense of this at a young age, and your parents know it right from the start.

A 10-12 year old kid doesn't know the impact and importance of a good education, no matter what the parents say.

>Why is wealthy people going to good schools going to deprive us of workers and researchers? Please explain.

Don't get me wrong, I believe in having different social classes, what point is there in being rich when you have nobody to compare it to, but a simple fact is that the vast majority of people will be simply too shortsighted or poor to go through any serious education.


 
antartica Posted: Thu May 20 07:12:31 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mmm... school girls...

d'oh! wrong site...


 
addi Posted: Thu May 20 07:39:01 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  antartica said:
>mmm... school girls...

HaHa! Yes, I believe you're lost young man. you need to go down the hall, take a left at the cafeteria, go up the flight of stairs, head left and walk down the hall till you get to Room Thread 69: Sexual Orientation and Plaid Skirts.

Don't forget your hall pass either


 
antartica Posted: Thu May 20 07:52:51 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>HaHa! Yes, I believe you're lost young man. you need to go down the hall, take a left at the cafeteria, go up the flight of stairs, head left and walk down the hall till you get to Room Thread 69: Sexual Orientation and Plaid Skirts.
>
>Don't forget your hall pass either

why thank you kind sir...!
lol


 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 08:39:45 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I dated a girl who had a school-uniform including a skirt once...

Good times.


 
marsteller Posted: Thu May 20 13:01:33 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  christophe, the "3 R's" are representative of the phonetics of the words....all R sounds....rather than the actual spelling of the words.


 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 13:23:19 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  marsteller said:
>christophe, the "3 R's" are representative of the phonetics of the words....all R sounds....rather than the actual spelling of the words.

Yeah I kind of got that as well but seems pretty stupid to type it out on a site trying to advocate a change in the schoolsystem.


 
Chaos Posted: Thu May 20 14:26:31 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  my largest concern with private schools would be that i live in the bible belt yet i am athiest. so most of the schools around here would become christian becuase the protection i am given by the government to seperate church and state would no longer apply. although i am out of the public school system now, would i want my kids going to a christian school? of course not, but that would mean that i would probably have to move to find a school free from religious influence.

perhaps we should have a skeleton system of public schools run by the government but at the same time promote a growth in the private sector of schooling. this way people would have a choice but, at the same time, would not be held back by that freedom.


 
Kira Posted: Thu May 20 15:19:56 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Sailovzi said:
>>
>A 10-12 year old kid doesn't know the impact and importance of a good education, no matter what the parents say.

Children know the value of their parents' guidance. If their parents send them to school they know there's a good reason for it.
>
>>
>Don't get me wrong, I believe in having different social classes, what point is there in being rich when you have nobody to compare it to, but a simple fact is that the vast majority of people will be simply too shortsighted or poor to go through any serious education.

Can you prove this "fact?" Show me an example of an area where education is private and optional and the majority of young people go uneducated.


So many people seem to think that without a nanny government everyone will run around like headless chickens. I would just like to know who the hell fancies the life of a headless chicken?! Yeah, let's ignore our children and do lots of drugs and not wear our bloody seatbelts, because I just have a feeling that's a great way to go through life.

Argh.

*Throws out five hundred word post.*


 
casper Posted: Thu May 20 15:26:27 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i wouldn't mind being a headless chicken....


 
Mark Posted: Thu May 20 15:30:49 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sailovzi said:

>Children know the value of their parents' guidance. If their parents send them to school they know there's a good reason for it.

Well...maybe in a perfect world, but not in the one I'm living. Here, we rebel against our parents, testing them, don't want to go to school. We certainly do not value our parents opinion until we a a little older, when we have seen some things in this world.

>Can you prove this "fact?" Show me an example of an area where education is private and optional and the majority of young people go uneducated.
As stated in my first post in this thread, even with government help I can barely keep myself at school. In the private school system, the schools need to compete. Imidiatly it is stated that it will lower the costs of going to school. I think it doesn't. As with free market economy, only the rich will have the beautiful things, the rest is left wanting


 
casper Posted: Thu May 20 15:37:01 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Something off topic but I just read somewhere that after Vietnam studies were done to find out why so many people had volunteered to fight in a country on the other side of the world which they had no connection to whatsoever.
>
>Results showed that vast numbers among them thought Vietnam bordered with the US, so they thought they were going to defend the national borders.


War is God's way of teaching Americans geography.
-Ambrose Bierce, writer (1842-1914)




 
Kira Posted: Thu May 20 16:37:20 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Wolffie said:
>Sailovzi said:
>>
>Here, we rebel against our parents, testing them, don't want to go to school. We certainly do not value our parents opinion until we a a little older, when we have seen some things in this world.

So why did you go to school at all? Because they were bigger than you?
>>
>As stated in my first post in this thread, even with government help I can barely keep myself at school. In the private school system, the schools need to compete. Imidiatly it is stated that it will lower the costs of going to school. I think it doesn't. As with free market economy, only the rich will have the beautiful things, the rest is left wanting

I don't know what the situation is in the Netherlands. Is the school system private? In a true private school system there would be no government loans. Do you pay taxes? Would you be better able to pay for school if you got some or most of that tax money back?

Yes, in a free market the rich get the best things. The smartest and most persistent get the best things. And they give back to the not-so-rich to become richer, and the not-so-rich give back to the even-less-rich to become richer, and the even-less-rich have roofs over their heads and food on their tables. It's not a perfect system, but it's the only system where everyone has an equal opportunity. And there will always be a market for the poor, because the rich will not pass up the opportunity to sell a product to them--they need things too.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 20 16:48:19 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sailovzi said:
>>Yes, in a free market the rich get the best things. The smartest and most persistent get the best things. And they give back to the not-so-rich to become richer, and the not-so-rich give back to the even-less-rich to become richer, and the even-less-rich have roofs over their heads and food on their tables. It's not a perfect system, but it's the only system where everyone has an equal opportunity. And there will always be a market for the poor, because the rich will not pass up the opportunity to sell a product to them--they need things too.
>
Well said Sailovzi, I like the way you think . . . . . .sometimes. LOL
But I think you are preaching to indoctrinated socialist ears here and your words will have pretty much no impact. Too bad, because they are so profound.


 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 16:49:52 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  casper said:
>Christophe said:
>>Something off topic but I just read somewhere that after Vietnam studies were done to find out why so many people had volunteered to fight in a country on the other side of the world which they had no connection to whatsoever.
>>
>>Results showed that vast numbers among them thought Vietnam bordered with the US, so they thought they were going to defend the national borders.
>
>
>War is God's way of teaching Americans geography.
> -Ambrose Bierce, writer (1842-1914)
>
>

Doesn't something like that bring questions to your mind?


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 17:03:54 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Something off topic but I just read somewhere that after Vietnam studies were done to find out why so many people had volunteered to fight in a country on the other side of the world which they had no connection to whatsoever.
>
>Results showed that vast numbers among them thought Vietnam bordered with the US, so they thought they were going to defend the national borders.

Even if some thought they bordered us, the vast majority of people that originally supported the war did so because of the threat of communism. We may be learning geography now in the U. S., but schools are still teaching that we went to crush the communists (which is krap).


 
casper Posted: Thu May 20 17:06:36 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
>Doesn't something like that bring questions to your mind?

i'm in the army remember? i don't think ;)

seriously though...besides basic skills (reading, writing etc etc) there's not not a lot i learned about actual facts in school. most of what i learned was how to look shit up if i wanted to know about it, how to reason shit out and of social skills. although according to the lady on the metro last year i didn't learn my social skills nearly so well :) but i digress...

i'm assuming it's different in other nations (and maybe even in other states within the u.s.) but my schooling consisted of teachers making me memorize x amount of information for x amount of time until the test came....then they could care less about whether or not i used that information later on in life (or even later on that day).


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 17:14:58 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  >most of what i learned was how to look shit up if i wanted to know about it, how to reason shit out and of social skills.

Yea, I hate teachers that say you're also at school to learn social skills. When in school do we learn social skills? Is it when we're not allowed to talk to one another? And most students will agree that social cliques are formed because they're not allowed to have more than a certain number of people at a lunch table.


 
casper Posted: Thu May 20 17:24:27 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:
>>most of what i learned was how to look shit up if i wanted to know about it, how to reason shit out and of social skills.
>
>Yea, I hate teachers that say you're also at school to learn social skills. When in school do we learn social skills? Is it when we're not allowed to talk to one another? And most students will agree that social cliques are formed because they're not allowed to have more than a certain number of people at a lunch table.

lol...well...i had no one really my age in the the neighborhood i lived in so school was pretty much the only place where i got to meet people. i also don't think most people belong to any "one" clique. while you may have a chunk of friends who can people catagorize in a certain way you always have a spattering of other friends in each of the other "groupings".


 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 17:35:10 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  casper said:
>i'm assuming it's different in other nations (and maybe even in other states within the u.s.) but my schooling consisted of teachers making me memorize x amount of information for x amount of time until the test came....

There seem to be some major differences in american and european schoolsystems.

I can't even begin to imagine anybody over 16 not knowing which countries border Europe, or at least which don't border it lol.

Weird.


 
addi Posted: Thu May 20 17:38:10 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:

>Yea, I hate teachers that say you're also at school to learn social skills. When in school do we learn social skills?

Zac, my boy, it's all relative. If any teacher ever told you that school is the only place to learn social skills it would be a crock. But, generally speaking, if you compare kids home schooled their whole life to those that were in a public school social setting the latter will be more adept in a social environment.
So what! you say
I would never diminish the importance of intelligence and having a marketable skill, but I can tell you from first hand experience that the person most adept at handling a variety of social situations will usually win out over the person who isn't so good at it.
right or wrong it's the way it is in the workplace and at other important social institutions.
No joke here; i've been in companies where a manager is less skilled than many who report to him, but because he had the "people" skills he rose in rank and in salary there.

So don't hate teachers. Love them for all there wonderful advice that will come in handy later in life : )


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 17:47:16 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>So don't hate teachers. Love them for all there wonderful advice that will come in handy later in life : )

In any given year of school, two of my teachers were effective and cared about their students succeeding (at least in a way that showed it), three were just there to teach the curriculum and get their paycheck, and there was always two who apparently had a hatred for all things younger than themselves. And from my experience, almost every teacher was convinced of their own infallibility when arguing with students.

I guess I was supposed to, somewhere along the line, learn to automatically give respect to my elders regardless of what they do. I, however, give respect when it is earned. If someone's only way to win an argument is to not let someone speak, then they are the ones who need to be taught.


 
addi Posted: Thu May 20 17:55:34 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I was just joking with that last "love your teachers" line, zacq.
must have hit a sore nerve.

I totally agree with you and my own son has said almost word for word the same thing to me about his teachers. I was a teacher. there ARE a lot of crappy ones out there i know.
I would never tell a student to blindly respect the intelligence of a teacher just because they teach.
I guess my point was just to remember that social skills are important later in life for most work environments that's all
you have my permission to hate your teachers if you want : )



 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 18:28:01 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>you have my permission to hate your teachers if you want : )

Thanks : ) Your permission was all I was waiting for.

Now I all need is express written consent from major league baseball...



 
FN Posted: Thu May 20 18:41:31 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hmm.

Well I have had the privilege (with 2-3 exceptions) to have had very motivated, sincere, and interesting teachers in my school carreer up to this point who have earned my respect because of that.

They're all very enthousiastic about their courses and the way they present the stuff to us really makes it interesting, even if they're there just to get their paycheck at least it doesn't seem like it. That helps a lot I guess in student-teacher contacts.

One of my economy teachers, who also teachers history, is one of my most admired people. Every single student at our school respects her out of admiration and that says a lot I think.


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 21:33:20 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  That's it, I'm moving to Europe.


 
addi Posted: Thu May 20 22:32:53 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:
>That's it, I'm moving to Europe.

you should know they require 2 years of social skills classes, one year of french anti-american slogan memorization, and a semester of proper dinner table ettiquette, or how to learn to blow smoke rings when you're 13 years old to graduate from european schools.

good luck, zacq


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 20 22:54:33 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ... Australia, here I come.


 
Kira Posted: Thu May 20 23:51:28 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>Zacq said:
>
>>Yea, I hate teachers that say you're also at school to learn social skills. When in school do we learn social skills?
>
>Zac, my boy, it's all relative. If any teacher ever told you that school is the only place to learn social skills it would be a crock. But, generally speaking, if you compare kids home schooled their whole life to those that were in a public school social setting the latter will be more adept in a social environment.

You know, I'm not going to disagree with this because looking at the kids I grew up with I think that in most cases it's true. But don't forget that an adult homeschooler would live and work in a world of adult highschoolers. Do think that same homeschooler would still have little social skill if the majority of his generation had been homeschooled just as he had?

The kids in my group all got along beautifully, but they had a certain way of behaving and relating to each other. If you stuck a highschooler in with us you could see the difference: he brought up odd subjects, he wasn't as talkative (could just be nervous), he even had different body language. I don't think it's so much that public-schooled kids have better social skills, it's just that right now they have the most common set of social skills.

And on the success point: where **I** used to work, **I** was a manager. :P Although in my case I think I got there because of my ability, because I was definitely less than popular. Oh, well.


 
Mark Posted: Fri May 21 03:04:53 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sailovzi said:
>So why did you go to school at all? Because they were bigger than you?

Well...yes. I had to go, I was forced to go.

>I don't know what the situation is in the Netherlands. Is the school system private? In a true private school system there would be no government loans. Do you pay taxes? Would you be better able to pay for school if you got some or most of that tax money back?

No the school system is not private, but when I compare with everything that became privaized...all the costs became higher. I do pay taxes and if I would get most back...ofcourse it would be easier to pay.

>Yes, in a free market the rich get the best things. The smartest and most persistent get the best things. And they give back to the not-so-rich to become richer, and the not-so-rich give back to the even-less-rich to become richer, and the even-less-rich have roofs over their heads and food on their tables. It's not a perfect system, but it's the only system where everyone has an equal opportunity. And there will always be a market for the poor, because the rich will not pass up the opportunity to sell a product to them--they need things too.

I do not agree with that the free market system is the only system where everybody gets an equal opportunity. In my opinion the equallity is a lot better in a true communistic (marxism) system. I can always be better when we realize that money is a thing of the past (no more economy, everything free, equally shared), but then human nature must change.


 
FN Posted: Fri May 21 06:33:51 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Which won't happen.


 
antartica Posted: Fri May 21 06:45:18 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Could You Have Passed
the 8th Grade in 1895?

In 1885 the 8th grade was considered upper level education. Many children quit school as soon as they could master the basic fundamentals of the 3 R's (reading, writing and arithmetic). Most never went past the 3rd or 4th grade. That's all you needed for the farm and most city jobs. Child labor laws were not in existence. Additionally today's education has much more focus on technology and sociology than the grammar and geography of old. It's a different world with different requirements and capabilities needed to succeed.

This is the eighth-grade final exam from 1895 from Salina, KS. It was taken from the original document on file at the Smoky Valley Genealogical Society and Library in Salina, KS and reprinted by the Salina Journal.

=================================

8th Grade Final Exam: Salina, KS - 1895

Grammar (Time, one hour)

1. Give nine rules for the use of Capital Letters.

2. Name the Parts of Speech and define those that have no modifications.

3. Define Verse, Stanza and Paragraph.

4. What are the Principal Parts of a verb? Give Principal Parts of do, lie, lay and run.

5. Define Case, Illustrate each Case.

6. What is Punctuation? Give rules for principal marks of Punctuation.

7 - 10. Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

Arithmetic (Time, 1.25 hours)

1. Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.

2. A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?

3. If a load of wheat weighs 3942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts. per bu., deducting 1050 lbs. for tare?

4. District No. 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?

5. Find cost of 6720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per ton.

6. Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.

7. What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $20 per m?

8. Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.

9. What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per acre, the distance around which is 640 rods?

10. Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a Receipt.

U.S. History (Time, 45 minutes)

1. Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided.

2. Give an account of the discovery of America by Columbus.

3. Relate the causes and results of the Revolutionary War.

4. Show the territorial growth of the United States.

5. Tell what you can of the history of Kansas.

6. Describe three of the most prominent battles of the Rebellion.

7. Who were the following: Morse, Whitney, Fulton, Bell, Lincoln, Penn, and Howe?

8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, and 1865?

Orthography (Time, one hour)

1. What is meant by the following: Alphabet, phonetic orthography, etymology, syllabication?

2. What are elementary sounds? How classified?

3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, linguals?

4. Give four substitutes for caret 'u'.

5. Give two rules for spelling words with final 'e'. Name two exceptions under each rule.

6. Give two uses of silent letters in spelling. Illustrate each.

7. Define the following prefixes and use in connection with a word: Bi, dis, mis, pre, semi, post, non, inter, mono, super.

8. Mark diacritically and divide into syllables the following, and name the sign that indicates the sound: Card, ball, mercy, sir, odd, cell, rise, blood, fare, last.

9. Use the following correctly in sentences, Cite, site, sight, fane, fain, feign, vane, vain, vein, raze, raise, rays.

10. Write 10 words frequently mispronounced and indicate pronunciation by use of diacritical marks and by syllabication.

Geography (Time, one hour)

1. What is climate? Upon what does climate depend?

2. How do you account for the extremes of climate in Kansas?

3. Of what use are rivers? Of what use is the ocean?

4. Describe the mountains of N.A.

5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fermandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco.

6. Name and locate the principal trade centers of the U.S.

7. Name all the republics of Europe and give capital of each.

8. Why is the Atlantic Coast colder than the Pacific in the same latitude?

9. Describe the process by which the water of the ocean returns to the sources of rivers.

10. Describe the movements of the earth. Give inclination of the earth.



 
mat_j Posted: Fri May 21 13:56:00 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I learned all my social skills from the moral lesson at then end of He-Man cartoons and i ended up just fine dag namit!



 
Kira Posted: Fri May 21 15:57:59 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Wolffie said:
>Sailovzi said:
>>So why did you go to school at all? Because they were bigger than you?
>
>Well...yes. I had to go, I was forced to go.

Well, I guess even children have different perspectives. When I was little I did what my parents told me, partly because I knew they could make me do it if they wanted, but mainly because I had a desire to cooperate and an awareness that they were smarter than I. I may not have liked it or understood it, but that's how I felt.

>>
>No the school system is not private, but when I compare with everything that became privaized...all the costs became higher. I do pay taxes and if I would get most back...ofcourse it would be easier to pay.

Do the private businesses pay taxes? How much? Do they have to compete with tax-funded counterparts?

So if the school system were private you would get those taxes back, to spend directly where it would best benefit your individual education and not also be broken up to pay the salaries of bureaucrats and administrators. Does that not seem like a better option?

>>
>I do not agree with that the free market system is the only system where everybody gets an equal opportunity. In my opinion the equallity is a lot better in a true communistic (marxism) system. I can always be better when we realize that money is a thing of the past (no more economy, everything free, equally shared), but then human nature must change.

I suppose everyone having no opportunity is equality too. But heck, maybe you're right. In an economy where property and comforts are as equally shared as the breath of life, individualism will find another way to shine through. But as soon as it did the system would fall apart. Someone always wants more.


 
FN Posted: Fri May 21 16:03:50 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sailovzi said:
>Someone always wants more.


Damn right.

Fuck equality.


 
antartica Posted: Sat May 22 03:41:59 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  just saw this article online... got bored so was searching for local dingapore colums to read... this fella is one of my faves... Siva Choy...

this is just a part of it... had a good laugh reading the geography part... is only an excerpt... for the whole article goto: http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/columnists/story/0,4136,45978,00.html?



300m trek, 20km van ride, 4 day wait
Thanks for the card, neighbour

By Siva Choy

I'M looking at a Christmas card sent to me from Canada by my friend's 9-year-old son.

The address on the envelope ends: 'Republic of Singapore, South East Asia, Planet Earth, The Solar System, The Milky Way, The Universe'.

Maybe he's worried the postman might send it somewhere else if the address isn't precise.

But good for you, kid! You're one up on the American university that once sent a letter to me addressed to Singapore, China.

And the other American university that sent me a letter addressed to Singapore, The Philippines. (It was from their Geography Department, may I add)...........




 
Asswipe Posted: Sun May 23 05:24:23 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i read the article but did not have time to read everyone's responses to it, and to each other, so i don't know if we're even on the same topic anymore, but.... the main problem i see, with the artical, is whether the main issue he stated would actually be solved by such a change.

"My experience as a public school student led me to believe that schools aren't about learning, but about socialization, brainwashing, and the inculcation of conformity."

while he may be right w/ this statement, he blames these problems on the connection between the state and schooling when other issues are certainly involved.

if schools were left in the hands of the teachers and the administrators, would much of the path of learning be changed? could the individual unit, not the government, create a better path of education and development?

the only thing i can think to compare it to are colleges which are, for the most part, controlled by individual units and are not run so differently then the state controlled grammar schools.


 



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