Generation Terrorists » Forum
Sign up   |   Start new thread   |   Lost password?   |   Edit profile   |   Member List   |   myGT   |   Blog
Keyword
From
To
 

MUST SEE TV
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 12:58:49 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hey Addie, Ann Coulter is going to enter the No Spin Zone with Bill O'reilly tonite.
Bet your just tingly all over at the thought of it.


 
addi Posted: Thu May 27 13:24:27 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  not sure if tingly is the word i'd use : )

too bad i don't have tivo cuz i'm already committed to watching the amazing world of fungi on the discovery science channel


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 13:56:05 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Did anyone watch the Colonial House series on PBS ?


 
addi Posted: Thu May 27 14:00:49 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i tried to watch it on 2 separate nights, but ended up turning the channel after a while. i was hoping for scarlet letter A adultry scenes, or at least a good witch burning, and it never happened when i was viewing. Damn PBS!


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 14:48:46 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I watched all of it til the last episode and of course the thunderstorms knocked our power out and we never found out if they were considered a successful colony or not.
Bummer.
Really enjoyed it though.


 
Mouse Posted: Thu May 27 15:02:14 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Me and my dad watched Colonial House.
I thought it was interesting how quickly they dropped the punishments for breaking colony laws. I think we must have missed part of it though, there was some fuss about Oprah staying at the colony and I never saw her.
They made the cut, hif. :) Even though they lost money in trading and didn't do much about the colony's debt. *shrug*
Mouse


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 15:15:59 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Mouse said:
>Me and my dad watched Colonial House.
>I thought it was interesting how quickly they dropped the punishments for breaking colony laws. I think we must have missed part of it though, there was some fuss about Oprah staying at the colony and I never saw her.
>They made the cut, hif. :) Even though they lost money in trading and didn't do much about the colony's debt. *shrug*
>Mouse
>
Oprah never actually stayed there, her and her crew were there for a few hours to do a plug for it on her show I think.


 
casper Posted: Thu May 27 15:17:49 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
>>
>Oprah never actually stayed there, her and her crew were there for a few hours to do a plug for it on her show I think.

no they stayed one whole night but her and her friend were deathly afraid of rats apparently and couldn't hack it


 
Mouse Posted: Thu May 27 15:20:35 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ah, the walking tour was it? ;)
Well, I guess I really didn't miss anything interesting.
Mouse


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 15:25:33 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Mouse said:
>Ah, the walking tour was it? ;)
>Well, I guess I really didn't miss anything interesting.
>Mouse
>
Rule of thumb - Oprah = not very interesting.



 
Mouse Posted: Thu May 27 15:31:56 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh, I just thought it would be funny to see her be wimpy and squeemish. As much as I'd like to defend her, she is rather boring most of the time.
The thing with the rats must have been a riot.
Mouse


 
addi Posted: Thu May 27 15:38:30 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i must interject on her behalf (even though i never catch her show) that she's doing wonderful things in South Africa helping thousands of children with HIV meds, education and teacher funding, and lifes basic necessities through her foundation. She does more to help the truely underpriveleged than just give lip service to their needs.

I think that helps offset her boringness ; )


 
Zacq Posted: Thu May 27 16:00:11 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ann Coulter and Bill? Neither one let's anyone else speak... I think it'll be pretty much the same thing as Addison's Amazing World of Fungi.


 
FN Posted: Thu May 27 16:02:03 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Zacq said:
>I think it'll be pretty much the same thing as Addison's Amazing World of Fungi.


I share addi's passion for documentaries.

About whatever.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 16:03:47 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>i must interject on her behalf (even though i never catch her show) that she's doing wonderful things in South Africa helping thousands of children with HIV meds, education and teacher funding, and lifes basic necessities through her foundation. She does more to help the truely underpriveleged than just give lip service to their needs.
>
>I think that helps offset her boringness ; )
>
Oh I don't doubt any of that for a minute, I was just referring to her show.

Did anyone see Bill Cosby pissed off the NAACP ? Now that was great !


 
mat_j Posted: Thu May 27 20:06:37 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>addison said:
>>i must interject on her behalf (even though i never catch her show) that she's doing wonderful things in South Africa helping thousands of children with HIV meds, education and teacher funding, and lifes basic necessities through her foundation. She does more to help the truely underpriveleged than just give lip service to their needs.
>>
>>I think that helps offset her boringness ; )
>>
>Oh I don't doubt any of that for a minute, I was just referring to her show.
>
>Did anyone see Bill Cosby pissed off the NAACP ? Now that was great !

Oh man i wish i could have seen that


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu May 27 21:33:14 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>addison said:
>>>i must interject on her behalf (even though i never catch her show) that she's doing wonderful things in South Africa helping thousands of children with HIV meds, education and teacher funding, and lifes basic necessities through her foundation. She does more to help the truely underpriveleged than just give lip service to their needs.
>>>
>>>I think that helps offset her boringness ; )
>>>
>>Oh I don't doubt any of that for a minute, I was just referring to her show.
>>
>>Did anyone see Bill Cosby pissed off the NAACP ? Now that was great !
>
>Oh man i wish i could have seen that
>
Sad to say it was not on tv, but you probably already read about it.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri May 28 07:01:08 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  An ovation for Bill Cosby
Brent Bozell
May 28, 2004

On the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision on Brown vs. Board of Education, which began the end of racial segregation being defended as "separate but equal," an anniversary party was thrown at Washington's historic Constitution Hall. The biggest name on the program was TV star Bill Cosby, and he packed the biggest -- and most unexpected -- wallop.

Cosby did not come boasting of progress, basking in satisfaction or marking a half-century of racial uplift. Instead, he slapped the audience with the rhetorical equivalent of a cold fish. In Cosby's big picture, too many black Americans today aren't raising their children correctly.

He lamented the upbringing of lower-income black children in particular. "They're standing on the corner and they can't speak English," he exclaimed. "I can't even talk the way these people talk: 'Why you ain't,' 'Where you is' ... And I blamed the kid until I heard the mother talk. And then I heard the father talk ... Everybody knows it's important to speak English except these knuckleheads ... You can't be a doctor with that kind of crap coming out of your mouth!"

It was no doubt additionally controversial when he proclaimed that many young black men in prison today are not "political criminals" but guilty of real crimes. "These are people going around stealing Coca-Cola. People getting shot in the back of the head over a piece of pound cake, and then we run out and we are outraged, (saying) 'The cops shouldn't have shot him.' What the hell was he doing with the pound cake in his hand?"

Parents who lament their children in prison jumpsuits were challenged: "Where were you when he was 2? Where were you when he was 12? Where were you when he was 18, and how come you didn't know he had a pistol? Where is the father?"

Cosby's remarks drew some laughter, and some unease. Ted Shaw of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund was angry, and he immediately followed up at the podium by suggesting that systematic racial discrimination was still to blame. Others protested. Black academic Michael Eric Dyson complained in the papers that Cosby's comments "betray classist, elitist viewpoints that are rooted in generational warfare."

Some younger people dismissed Cosby as sounding like somebody's cranky grandpa, an old codger lecturing to sit up straight, respect your elders, and use nouns and verbs in their proper order. But this wasn't just old Cosby. It was the creed of the young Cosby, too.

He was never just a television star. He was the first real television role model for black America. He didn't make his way into America's hearts with anger but with humor. He didn't win over whites by laughing about all our racial differences but about our common humanity. The "generational warfare" isn't coming from Cosby, but from the "thug life" theorists selling the black community nothing but hate, greed and lust to a thumping rap beat -- three serious obstacles to black progress.

Some intellectualizing types are actually suggesting Cosby failed to grasp that ungrammatical English -- or ignorance to the ear of the average American -- is actually precious folklore. On ABC's "Good Morning America," Time magazine cultural critic Christopher John Farley explained that he respected standard English, "but I think it's also important to respect nonstandard English. I think it has an important role to play in the development of language, and we should respect that. In terms of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston ... even the music of Bob Marley uses nonstandard English to create poetry and to bring joy to people."

Do you suppose Mr. Farley earned his job at Time magazine talking or writing that kind of "poetry"? Would his editors today respect his use of "non-standard English" if he employed it for next week's magazine? If it isn't acceptable for Mr. Farley in the workplace, how dare he encourage it for black children!

Bill Cosby has given millions of his own fortune back to the black community, but his words and actions might mean more than the money. His television career has done more than entertain. It has helped build a multiracial culture demanding excellence as well as racial harmony. Cosby's critics are offering the opposite: excuses instead of excellence, rage instead of humanity. He deserves a nationwide standing ovation for speaking out.





 
addi Posted: Fri May 28 08:21:30 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
Some whites love it when any prominent black american speaks out against other blacks.
it helps to justify their racial intolerance.

one of the reasons the cosby show was so well accepted here was that he was funny. Another was that he was non-threatening to whites. Everything about the show fit nicely into white standards of acceptability. He was a doctor. the kids were normal kids that spoke proper english. he had a beautiful intelligent liberated wife. If not for the color of their skin it might as well have been about the comical mishaps of a white suburban family. If the Cosby Show had been a more accurate portrayal of the "typical" black home it would not have been America's #1 rated show for so many years. Bill was/is one of the "good niggers" because his beliefs conform to our white standards of acceptable behavior for an african american.

I happen to think there was a lot of truth in his comments to the NAACP. It needed to be said, and it needed to come from the mouth of a respected black american. I believe blacks need to heed his criticisms and do some soul searching about playing the victim and using it as a crutch.

i just hope white america doesn't twist Mr. Cosbys intent and use his words to fuel their bigotry. Let the african american community grapple with these concerns and have some healthy debates on Cosby's opinions. They don't really need any white journalists butting in with their two cents right now.

Speaking as a white american we have plently of our own faults that still need to be addressed, without worrying too much about what black americans are doing to fix their problems.




 
Zacq Posted: Fri May 28 10:42:25 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I watched Bill and Ann and I now hate Bill slightly less. When she said stuff like the war in Iraq going perfectly, he made it pretty obvious to everyone else she had no idea what she was talking about.

I fully expected her to scream "Treason!" and then storm the camera.


 
addi Posted: Fri May 28 10:56:16 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  compared to Ann, Bill is sane


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri May 28 11:05:43 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>
> Some whites love it when any prominent black american speaks out against other blacks.
>it helps to justify their racial intolerance.
>
>one of the reasons the cosby show was so well accepted here was that he was funny. Another was that he was non-threatening to whites. Everything about the show fit nicely into white standards of acceptability. He was a doctor. the kids were normal kids that spoke proper english. he had a beautiful intelligent liberated wife. If not for the color of their skin it might as well have been about the comical mishaps of a white suburban family. If the Cosby Show had been a more accurate portrayal of the "typical" black home it would not have been America's #1 rated show for so many years. Bill was/is one of the "good niggers" because his beliefs conform to our white standards of acceptable behavior for an african american.
>
>I happen to think there was a lot of truth in his comments to the NAACP. It needed to be said, and it needed to come from the mouth of a respected black american. I believe blacks need to heed his criticisms and do some soul searching about playing the victim and using it as a crutch.
>
>i just hope white america doesn't twist Mr. Cosbys intent and use his words to fuel their bigotry. Let the african american community grapple with these concerns and have some healthy debates on Cosby's opinions. They don't really need any white journalists butting in with their two cents right now.
>
>Speaking as a white american we have plently of our own faults that still need to be addressed, without worrying too much about what black americans are doing to fix their problems.
>
The black community is in crisis much more than the white community. 70% of their children are born without a father to help raise them. They have almost no credible leaders unless you want to count Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton.HA!
When was the last time you heard either one of these black icons actually pitching any solutions to the plight of the black community ? The only keep the racism pot stirred up and that keeps their pockets lined.
Mr. Cosby's comments were exactly on the money. Why would you buy your kid a pair of 250 dollar shoes when he can't read or write ? you buy him a book instead !
Too many in the black do not value education as much as they value the ideology that they are victims.
I do resent somewhat that you would imply that I am racially intolerant because I applaud Mr. Cosby's efforts to get some straight talk out there instead of the politically correct crap that has victimized the black community for way too long.


 
addi Posted: Fri May 28 11:42:04 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:

>I do resent somewhat that you would imply that I am racially intolerant

I said:
Some whites love it when any prominent black american speaks out against other blacks

I did not say, Hif loves it when...

Don't get paranoid on me friend.
Also notice that I said I agreed with Cosbys comments.

The point that i probably didn't do a good job expressing was that having a big media blitz (O'Reilly and Neil Bortz jumped all over it the next day) is not a prudent course of action.

Come on down to Auburn Street here in Atlanta and stand on a street corner and repeat Mr. Cosby's Words of truth and see how much healing and healthy introspection you create.

Let the black community deal with this one amoungst themselves. The last thing they need is Mr. Whitey pointing fingers and saying, "Yeah"




 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri May 28 12:10:03 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:
>ifihadahif said:
>
>>I do resent somewhat that you would imply that I am racially intolerant
>
>I said:
>Some whites love it when any prominent black american speaks out against other blacks
>
>I did not say, Hif loves it when...
>
>Don't get paranoid on me friend.
>Also notice that I said I agreed with Cosbys comments.
>
>The point that i probably didn't do a good job expressing was that having a big media blitz (O'Reilly and Neil Bortz jumped all over it the next day) is not a prudent course of action.
>
>Come on down to Auburn Street here in Atlanta and stand on a street corner and repeat Mr. Cosby's Words of truth and see how much healing and healthy introspection you create.
>
>Let the black community deal with this one amoungst themselves. The last thing they need is Mr. Whitey pointing fingers and saying, "Yeah"
>
We have similar street corners here as well. Muhammad Ali blvd and 38th St.
The problem is, too many blacks are already pointing their fingers at whitey and saying it's our fault they can't read and write and are killing each other at an alarming rate.


 



[ Reply to this thread ] [ Start new thread ]