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Ahriman Posted: Fri Apr 15 06:51:24 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Leaving for allegheny state park today. Be back on sunday. LOVE camping. hiking and fishing all weekend so I shall talk to gt again sometime soon.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Apr 15 06:59:36 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Awesome man. Have a great time, as I'm sure you will since camping is so much fun.

Hurry back here with good camping stories.


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 15 07:20:39 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Enjoy mother nature, Ahriman. I miss camping so much.
and keep an eye out for the vagisnakes...they're all over that state park.


 
Paulo Posted: Fri Apr 15 07:54:30 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Enjoy the campino.

I never enjoy camping as i'm in love with my television too much. Sadly I have to suffer it usually once a year with the trip to the Reading Music Festival, best thing about camping for me is the coming home part.


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Apr 15 08:03:21 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I love camping. When you look up at the sky and you can actually see the Milky Way (while shoving smores into your mouth)? What's better than that? Grin. Have an awesome time.


 
Mouse Posted: Fri Apr 15 11:55:30 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Have fun.

I miss camping. Dagnabit, this just seems to be my day to get depressed.


 
libra Posted: Fri Apr 15 13:42:25 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I can't camp. I'm a whiney bitch in those situations. i don't mind being in nature and dirt until bedtime, but if i have to sleep in it...ugh, i can't handle it. And I'm scared to death of spiders and other things like that. My friends and I drive out to the beach on summer evenings, watch the sun set, start a campfire and roast marshmallows and look at the stars (so bright out there at the coast with no city lights to distract...but that's as close as I get to camping.


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 15 14:58:50 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  In my earlier days I very high priority for me in choosing any girl to get serious with was her liking to camp and do go on adventures outdoors. If I discovered she wouldn't cuz of the bugs, or the lack of proper bathrooms, or she might break a nail.....it was over. We didn't have enough in common to pursue things farther.
And there's nothing quite like being all warm in a double down sleeping bag cuddled up to a plinker, and listening to the sound of a light rain hitting the tent walls, or hearing the water of a nearby stream as you fall off to sleep.

(this wasn't meant as a slam on you, Libra. For you i would have made an exception)
: )


 
breeze Posted: Fri Apr 15 15:01:47 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I love camping! When I used to live with my parents my dad would take me camping almost every weekend. He'd give me those "survivor" lessons on what to eat, where to drink, when to run or freeze. We got into couple of extreme situations as well, but it was always fun... He'd also show me how to take pictures and all (he's amateur an photographer). **Sigh** I miss it...

Have lots of fun! :)


 
jennemmer Posted: Fri Apr 15 15:55:22 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I grew up spending the summer at a family cottage so I never did much "real" camping, ie. I have only slept in a tent a few times in my life. Otherwise the experiences I think have probably been similar.

Bugs - check
Lack of shower, washing in cold lake - check
Outhouse trips in the middle of the night - check

We got running and hot water when I was 9 and a proper toilet when I was 12. Now my mom has it fully winterized and is living out there. The changes are nice but it has lost some of it's character building charm.


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Apr 15 16:18:31 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
And there's nothing quite like being all warm in a double down sleeping bag cuddled up to a plinker, and listening to the sound of a light rain hitting the tent walls, or hearing the water of a nearby stream as you fall off to sleep.



le sigh.
I agree.


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 15 16:42:44 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>And there's nothing quite like being all warm in a double down sleeping bag cuddled up to a plinker, and listening to the sound of a light rain hitting the tent walls, or hearing the water of a nearby stream as you fall off to sleep.

That or the hands of 15 children trying to tear it down from the outside at midnight.

I've never been camping in "the woods", sinds we don't have that in Belgium. I remember a while ago a reporter wrote about it. He set off trying to find houses that didn't have another house within a 1 kilometer radius (that's about 2/3rds of a mile I think) and well, he couldn't find a single one.


 
Kira Posted: Fri Apr 15 17:13:14 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>I've never been camping in "the woods", sinds we don't have that in Belgium. I remember a while ago a reporter wrote about it. He set off trying to find houses that didn't have another house within a 1 kilometer radius (that's about 2/3rds of a mile I think) and well, he couldn't find a single one.

That rules out me ever moving to Belgium. *Shudders*


Have fun, Ahriman.


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Apr 15 17:15:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>That or the hands of 15 children trying to tear it down from the outside at midnight.
>
This summer I took a road trip across the western US for 6 weeks, and in Spokane, WA, we couldn't find our campsite in this national park. So we ended up stopping at the entrance where there was this old ski lodge. It was empty except for the two caretakers, who said they had "no rooms available." On top of that, the shop downstairs where we tried to buy some food for the night was full of stuff that dated back to the 1970s... magazines, food expiration dates. It was so messed up. We got the hell out of there, but it was late, so we decided to pitch a tent on the common ground across the street, where the lodge had outdoor bathrooms and whatnot.
There ended up being these homeless people down at the end of the common ground, and they were a rough bunch. I was with two boys, and we decided to camp there anyway. None of us slept. It was, by far, one of the scariest experiences of my life.

(To save time and space, I left out a lot of the juicier, scarier details, but you get the picture. It was so eerie.)


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 15 17:34:45 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>That rules out me ever moving to Belgium. *Shudders*

Yeah well, the whole country is more or less 1 stretched city. It's less dense in some places.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Apr 15 18:02:54 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Kira said:
>>That rules out me ever moving to Belgium. *Shudders*
>
>Yeah well, the whole country is more or less 1 stretched city. It's less dense in some places.
>
I know that Belgium is the second or third most densley populated country in the world, but are there no woods anywhere in the country ?
Surely there are wooded mountains with camping within driving range ?
Bummer if not.
Some damn fine camping to be had here in Kentucky and I've done a lot of it.
But since I am older now, I really prefer a cabin with a hot tub and a jacuzzi. I do encourage all my children to continue our tradition of one or two camping trips in the fall though.
Nothing like a cup of hot cocoa sweetened with a shot of brandy around an evening campfire with a little nip in the air that says winter is just around the corner.


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 15 20:57:47 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>are there no woods anywhere in the country ?

The Flemish (northern) part is highly developed, nothing coming close to "woods", you have some less populated spaces, but the whole northern part is indeed more or less a whole big and stretched city.

Ofcourse, you have the cores of "actual" city, but most of it would be what you call suburbs.

It's because of that also extremely hard to find a dark spot here, Belgium has one of the most dense and lighted roadsystems in the world.

We have a lot of green in the form of trees along all the roads (my whole street is pink during spring because of the blossoming trees) and the patches of grass for cows and stuff outside of the cities, or some other kind of farm land.

In the southern part it's far less developed, and instead of one big city you might think of it as a stretched out town. You have a lot of nature, compared to the northern part, and you have a lot more "open" space, but no "woods", only some small patches that you might consider woods, but it would simply be impossible to get lost in Belgium without running into people after an hour.

>Surely there are wooded mountains with camping within driving range ?

We don't have mountains (500+ metres), as the country is located right next to the sea. We have some high hills in the southern part, but that's it.



If you're used to being in a less developed no man's land I guess it would be a bit weird to live here, but I'm used to it and wouldn't trade it for anything, seriously. Weird as it may sound, I do believe that Flanders is one of, if not the best region to live in the world. I've visited quite a few countries, and have yet to find anything that comes close. I dunnow why, I'm guessing it's the atmosphere, the architecture, whatever. I guess everybody feels that way about their own region. The best about leaving Flanders is when you come back and you see the Flemish Lion on the signs as you enter it. Almost sends chills up your spine as you realise you're in your own territory again.


 
libra Posted: Sat Apr 16 03:17:30 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ugh. i was watching The Big Lebowski tonight(i liked it a lot by the way) with my boyfriend at his apartment, sitting on his bed, eating tiramisu, when this spider appears on the pillow next to me...

i can't even handle elements of camping when i'm inside a house...

to make a long story short, we had to strip the bed of covers after he failed to kill the spider the first time and search his room until we found the spider. Which we did. So we could continue to watch the movie in peace.


 
addi Posted: Sat Apr 16 21:24:02 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:

>i can't even handle elements of camping when i'm inside a house...

lol
I admit when i was still a teen and camping in Canada I would ALWAYS do a flashlight check of the inside of my sleeping bag before i would crawl in. I had to be sure no spiders snuck in.
: )


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Apr 16 22:52:09 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>are there no woods anywhere in the country ?
>
>The Flemish (northern) part is highly developed, nothing coming close to "woods", you have some less populated spaces, but the whole northern part is indeed more or less a whole big and stretched city.
>
So how far would you have to drive to find a decent place to camp, assuming you would be going to another country ?


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Apr 16 23:07:42 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>flashlight check of the inside of my sleeping bag before i would crawl in.


And always check your shoes.


I can't wait to go camping again.
I would go anytime of the year if I had the proper equipment and willing friends. For now though I must wait til it gets a little warmer.

Tomorrow is going to be 23 degrees [celcius]. So I am going to the beach with my bike!





 
Mesh Posted: Sun Apr 17 01:06:33 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Trying to find a camping spot in Benelux would be terribly hard.


 



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