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How do you pick the courses in university?
CorDrine Posted: Sun May 8 10:00:08 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  This issue always bugs me, even when I am picking the courses to study for my postgrads.

How does your university graduation criteria functions? For us, we have to hit an average B+ to graduated. Thus, most people study modules that are easy to pass, instead of taking things they might be interested in learning.

It was highlighted by a phD scholar that this criteria does not encourages student to learn. I for one agrees with him.

In my uni days, we have something called a cross-faculthy activity to encourage student to study things which would interest them so that they can become a well rounded individual. Coming from a computing faculty, most of my course mate took mathematic as a cross fac because it was easier for them to score and get high grades. I took chinese history, and japanese instead.

At my recently enroll post graduate course, I was faced with the same problem again. Take the course I am interested in and score average grade, or take dumb courses and pass with flying colours.....

I still stuck to my gut feeling for the following reason though:
1. I am there to learn, not to get a paper qualification.
2. I paid for it, might as well study something I am interested in, instead of something I am not, even though it involves less work.
3. The harder courses would help me more technically in my area of work.

But in doing so, it also mean that I have to:
1. face the risk of failing harder subjects.
2. Suffer from average or below average grades, while my non-technical course mate just waltz thru and get better grades.
3. Sacrifce more hours doing projects.

I wish they could come up with a school were grades don't matter. That as long as you are willing to learn, they will let you continue. It take out the stress, and let you learn things you are really interested in, instead of juggling your grades and worrying about whether they will kick you out of school if your grades slipped.

Any opinion from you guys? Does your uni works in the same way?


 
Posted: Sun May 8 11:43:45 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I try to balance it as best as I can, but generally, I will take a class that I'm interested in over a class that I know I'll do well in, but will be bored as hell, and won't gain anything from.

This is why I took 19th Century German Philosophy over Symbolic Logic this semester; I did terrible in 19th cent. German, but what I learned will help me understand concepts a great deal better in my next two years (Phenomenology, Critical Theory, etc.)

The University of Windsor, for the most part, aims at careers more than education; theoretical knowledge isn't as valued as practical knowledge here, and the business and engineering schools are enormous compared to the arts. The University encourages us towards the practical sciences largely.


 
beetlebum Posted: Sun May 8 12:06:01 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The system I'm in is pretty wicked. We take our core papers our first year in politics, philosophy, and economics. In June we sit exams that cover the entire year; while one may get a distinction, the emphasis is placed simply on passing. (Very few fail.) In this way, the first year is more about exploring opportunities and doing the best one can academically without too many exams. (We write ALOT of loooooong researched essays that we use to revise for exams.)

Then, the next two years I can choose to drop a subject or keep all three. Either way, I choose which courses I like to take, and since the entire degree is research based, I can make of it what I want. The exams are extremely difficult, but often there are so many questions that you can find something that you'd like to answer. The best part is, since all of my classes are tutorials (just me and the tutor, or two of us and the tutor) we can shape it any way we like.

So, no exams for the next two years. Of course, that means that exams at the end of third year are a bitch, but i think it's worth it. Knowledge should be cumulative and cross over into other subjects, analysis should be rigorous, and writing should be clear, concise, and engaging, and our opinions, which pervade everything here, should be well-supported and logical.

I'm happy. : )


 
Asswipe Posted: Mon May 9 01:49:25 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CorDrine said:
>I wish they could come up with a school were grades don't matter. That as long as you are willing to learn, they will let you continue. It take out the stress, and let you learn things you are really interested in, instead of juggling your grades and worrying about whether they will kick you out of school if your grades slipped.

well, who says you need to take these classes that interest you in school? it's simple enough to simply look at a course's syllabus then go down to the bookstore or www.amazon.com, pick up the book, and persue your own interests privately. you lose the benefit of having a professor to help with the material, but chances are you can find help somewhere.

>
>Any opinion from you guys? Does your uni works in the same way?

my school has a list of core requirements that one must take, including 2 natural sciences, math, history, fine arts, writing, social science, political science, and maybe some more. these are primarily very low level and are easy as hell if you can force yourself to go to class. after that, you pick a major and each major has it's own required classes one must take to receive a degree in said field.

umm, i'm amidst working on final papers and studying for end of the year tests so am pretty much fucked right now.

i'm not interested in what i'm studying, and the school offers no degree in what i'm interested in. i want to drop out but i'm two days of working my ass off away from getting a little paper that says i've a degree in english... bah, going to go make more tea...


 
CorDrine Posted: Mon May 9 02:44:51 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:
>i'm not interested in what i'm studying, and the school offers no degree in what i'm interested in. i want to drop out but i'm two days of working my ass off away from getting a little paper that says i've a degree in english... bah, going to go make more tea...

geez! that is one situation I don't want to end up in! ha ha! I like what I am studying.


 
Kira Posted: Thu Apr 6 01:16:56 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I don't pick 'cuz I don't go.


 



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