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addi Posted: Wed Oct 26 19:06:42 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  This time of year I start thinking about family and traditions. Maybe it's the upcoming holidays. Anyway I'd like to hear about certain family traditions you folks have..especially you overseas GTers that have different holidays and customs than us Americanos. Not necessarily just holiday ones, but maybe certain quirky traditions you had in your family growing up. Silly ones, important ones...any kind of tradition that has stuck with you.

For instance...
My father took us up canoeing in the Boundary Waters area of Minnesota and Canada for several years. He started a tradition called the sundowner with us. Each evening after we had made camp and were getting the fire and dinner started he would call us all together (even us young'uns) at sunset and say "It's sundowner time!" He'd pour each of us a cup of wine and we'd drink to the day. Never any speeches or toasts. It was always a "reflection" moment just to silently think. I always thought it was kinda weird, and at that age I didn't particularly care for the taste of wine, but now I look back on it with fond memories of some beautiful times together as a family.

What are yours?


 
libra Posted: Wed Oct 26 20:55:40 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hehe, you reminded me of my love of red wine at a very young age...my dad used to always let me have a sip of his wine...i loved it.

I don't know whether we have any really special traditions...my mom's side of the family is really close, and we focus on getting together, even though our gatherings are usually somewhat informal...it's still really important for us to get together for "fall birthdays," thanksgiving, christmas, easter, and "spring birthdays"

It's also a time when my cousins and i get pampered with gifts...


 
choke Posted: Wed Oct 26 21:35:30 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  My family usually take the piss out of shows like Dr. Phil, and one of them read this article about parenting where it said to ask each child about the best and worst points of their day at the dinner table and give praise where necesary etc etc..

So every night we do the so what was the best part of your day? What was the worst part of your day? thing, except we mangle it and it always ends up being shocking and hilarious. If I brought a boy home it'd be even worse, and he'd be asked first and think we were serious. Good times.


 
libra Posted: Wed Oct 26 22:39:34 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
>
>So every night we do the so what was the best part of your day? What was the worst part of your day? thing, except we mangle it and it always ends up being shocking and hilarious. If I brought a boy home it'd be even worse, and he'd be asked first and think we were serious. Good times.

hahaha, we did that for a little while...my parents did it seriously at first (i know, so sad) but then it ended up being a total joke. My worst part would always be some variation of "having to do my best and worst parts of my days tonight" and my best part would generally be something like "looking forward to being done with this stupid conversation" ...silly parents...


 
iggy Posted: Wed Oct 26 22:54:54 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  my office has one.

it's called get drunk and play xbox lol


 
Posted: Thu Oct 27 01:02:59 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  My dad and I go see a baseball game at a new stadium every year (the nearby stadium pool isn't too big, though; Chicago1, Chicago2, Baltimore, Toronto, Detroit... that's the gist of it, really) in April, around my birthday. It's great!


 
jennemmer Posted: Thu Oct 27 01:06:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I live at home with my dad still and every Easter I still find a trail of jelly-beans from my bedroom door to a basket of easter candy in the living room. He said that he has too much fun with it to want to give it up for a tiny little detail like the fact that I'm 24.

My boyfriend and I have a new years tradition that dates back even to before we were dating. Every year around new years we head out for a late night drive on the highway that circles the city. We put on some good tunes and talk about what we thought of the previous year, future plans, things that the other is doing that drive us completely insane, the little things we worry about... that sort of stuff. It helps bring the new year in with a clean slate.


 
addi Posted: Thu Oct 27 07:41:56 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  jennemmer said:
>I live at home with my dad still and every Easter I still find a trail of jelly-beans from my bedroom door to a basket of easter candy in the living room.

: )
Yours reminds me of another one my father instituted. Every Easter growing up he'd hide small chocolate easter eggs outside. All of us would be assigned a different color and we had to find our colored egg in order to get our baskets. He kept this up until most of us were adults and had moved away. Even now living hundreds of miles away from him he sends a "basket" through the mail without exception every Easter. The contents are always things like dark chocolate, nuts, jellybeans, and coffee (he knows I'm a fanatic about coffee).
A silly tradition, but even at my age I still look forward to it each year.


 
Mark Posted: Thu Oct 27 13:28:54 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  When my parents where still together we used to have breakfast together each sunday morning. I couldn't really care about it back then, but I do miss it now.

I do have one sort of tradition with my father though. Every year my mom, her boyfriend and my brother go to Portugal for vacation and during that time period my father and I are going to eat outdoors as many times as possible.


 
Ed Posted: Fri Oct 28 21:19:26 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  On Thanksgiving and Christmas these last couple of years, my brother and I go visit our mom's family for dinner, then our dad's family for dinner...then we go to get a real dinner at Denny's.


 
misszero Posted: Sun Oct 30 23:16:35 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  on christmas day, my mothers side of the family comes to our house, and we laze around in the pool waiting for lunch to be cooked etc, then we eat it (complete with bon-bons and silly hates and lame jokes and all that) then we all kinda nap, or swim, or play playstation. then the whole family plays Pool (with cues etc. you know. lol) and its all pretty cruisy

on christmas eve, i like to spend time with my friends. a few years back, we had a barbeque (could i get any more aussie? sheesh) in King Edward Park (that means nothing to you, i know) and flew kites, and ate hash cake, and met new friends through each other, and then ended up in the first private swimming pool in Aust, The Bogey Hole (scraped out of the cliff by convicts for someone or another). all in all, and awesome awesome time, and one i'd like to cement into tradition.


 
Mesh Posted: Sun Oct 30 23:30:18 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  When I was younger me and my siblings would all walk to a candy/pastrie shop every Sunday morning, get lots of good eatin' stuff, and then go out into a public square and just all sit and talk and eat, tell jokes, etc. When it rained, we'd go into a CoffeeHouse instead.


It wasn't really a tradition, but a couple of summers when I was still really little we went to one of the beaches that always had fewer people and just kind of camped out there for a few days. Swam and tanned during the day, started a little fire and grilled some meats and whatnot for snacks and told stories and played music during the evening and night.


 
Mesh Posted: Sun Oct 30 23:35:11 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh, also, when I was a bit older I used to take my little sister to Animal Shops whenever she got good marks or something, and they'd let us take out and play with puppies, and kittens and little rabbits and whatnot. She loved it.


 
addi Posted: Mon Oct 31 07:25:17 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  misszero said:
>on christmas day, my mothers side of the family comes to our house, and we laze around in the pool waiting for lunch to be cooked etc,

It is SO nice to see you around here misszero
: )


 
addi Posted: Mon Oct 31 07:32:45 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  meshuggah said:
>and they'd let us take out and play with puppies, and kittens and little rabbits and whatnot.

meshuggah said:
>started a little fire and grilled some meats and whatnot for snacks

I certainly hope that these "whatnots" you speak of aren't some type of cute little animals

"What's on the grill? Smells delish!"

"Teriyaki marinated Whatnots...ummm umm!"


: )


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Nov 2 16:47:24 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>
>I certainly hope that these "whatnots" you speak of aren't some type of cute little animals
>


They look like little bunnies, only a thousand times cuter. People have been known to die from looking directly at them, as a result of saying ""awwwww" for too long without stopping to breathe. They taste like oreo-cheesecake.


True story, I swear I didn't make it up just now.






Except I did.




 
Kira Posted: Wed Nov 2 17:56:10 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  meshuggah said:
>They look like little bunnies, only a thousand times cuter. People have been known to die from looking directly at them, as a result of saying ""awwwww" for too long without stopping to breathe. They taste like oreo-cheesecake.
>

Aww.

They sound yummy.


 



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