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The official book recommendation topic
Mesh Posted: Thu Nov 10 14:58:40 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Post here when you've read a great book that you think others here might enjoy or should consider reading!


 
Mesh Posted: Thu Nov 10 14:59:41 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  My first reommendation is

"Would you learn to put topics in the right section already before clicking post?"

Author unknown.


 
Howitzer Posted: Thu Nov 10 16:58:41 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbings

Hitchhicker's Guide by Douglas Adams


(and I know how you feel mesh, i did it earlier with my Tom Robbins post)


 
novemberrain Posted: Thu Nov 10 18:56:52 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  1. Smoke and Mirrors by Neil Gaiman

-A bunch of short stories, but in particular read 'Snow, Glass, Apples.'

2. Cemetary Dance Vol I and II edited by Richard Chizmar

-Another collection of stories, most of which are pretty good

3. Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo


 
Mesh Posted: Thu Nov 10 19:33:50 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The Sunne In Splendour by Sharon Kay Penman
-A novel about Richard III and the Wars of the Roses period of England. So if you're interested in that type of stuff its a pretty good book.


The Clash of Fundamentalisms: Crusades, Jihads, and Modernity by Tariq Ali


 
libra Posted: Thu Nov 10 20:11:18 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Just finished Middlesex by Jeffrey Euginides(for my gender and women's study class), which was really really good.
Um, other than that, i'm not sure right now, it's been so long since i've read something for fun.



 
DanSRose Posted: Thu Nov 10 20:41:13 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Stiff by Mary Roach

Lamb by Christopher Moore

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Dubliners by James Joyce

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt

Angels in America by Tony Kushner
and
Picasso at the Lapin Agile by Steve Martin


 
addi Posted: Thu Nov 10 21:06:39 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I've heard Middlesex is very good, but I haven't read it.

Dan, good list. You reminded me of my college days with the Dubliners. Sheesh...it's been a long time that I've picked up a Joyce book.


*Howi...nice pic, and it's nice to see you around again here.


 
DanSRose Posted: Thu Nov 10 22:13:29 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm also adding:
City of Falling Angels, also by John Berendt, about Venice and the burning of the Fenice opera house.

1,000 Places to See Before You Die by Patricia Schultz.

Reasons to Live by Amy Hempel. Also, The Dog of the Marriage.

Sandman: Endless Nights by Neil Gaiman (a graphic novel)

Maus (parts 1&2) by Art Spiegelman (another graphic novel)

Grendel by John Gardner
and
because because because
Johnny, the Homicidal Maniac by Jhonen Vasquez (of Invader ZIM)


 
zander83 Posted: Thu Nov 10 23:00:00 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Innumeracy by John Allen Paulos
Like of PI Yann Marterl
Dubliners by James Joyce

Thats what I've read in the last few months that wasn't work oriented and was pretty good.


 
kurohyou Posted: Thu Nov 10 23:46:50 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  "Extremly Loud and Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer

"The Art of Happiness" by His Holiness the Dalhi Lama

"Black Like Me" (Can't remember Author right now)

"American Gods" by Neil Gaimen

"Last of the Mochicans" by James Finmore Cooper

"The Sun Also Rises" by Ernest Hemmingway

"Word Power Made Easy"

"The Art of War" by Sun Tzu

Those are the ones that caught my attention on the bookshelf that I can see from where I'm sitting.


 
Howitzer Posted: Fri Nov 11 03:47:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Dan:
Good picks, i love the ones you know that i have read and i am gonna read the ones i have'nt.

kurohyou: same to you.

Addi: glad i am back and that pic is a work of art (if you want to know i will talk about it later).


Other works i forgot to recommend:
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn, anything else by Daniel Quinn, anything by Jack Keroauc (esp. On the Road and Dharma Bums and The Subterranians if you are in to experimental english writing...it will blow your mind).

And my favorite of all time is Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire. If you have not read this book then go out and get it now!!!

That is all I have to say.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Nov 11 04:25:55 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  *takes notes on books to get*


 
mat_j Posted: Fri Nov 11 06:14:55 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I've been reading these books by a feller by the name of Malcolm Pryce, they're hardboiled detective novels about a P.I called Louie knight, set in the seaside town of Aberystwyth in West Wales. In mthe books Aber is made out to be a seedy den of iniquity, with druids acting as the towns gangsters and numerous veterans of Welsh- Patagonian war or the 'Welsh Vietnan' wandering around the icecream stands and 24 hour whelk stalls.

The strories are twisted, dark and i love 'em

they are in the following order

Aberystwyth Mon Aaour

Last Tango in Aberystwyth

The unbearable Lightness of Being in Aberystwyth


 
antartica Posted: Fri Nov 11 06:17:33 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  tuesdays with morrie

& the 5 people you meet in heaven - Mitch Albom

Norgewian Wood - Haruki Murakami

Raise the red lantern - Su Tong

Empress Orchid - Anchee Min

Geisha of Gion - Mineko Iwasaki

Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance - Robert Pirsig

already mentioned:

Middlesex
Life of Pi




 
antartica Posted: Fri Nov 11 06:19:35 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  and how can i forget "the giving tree" - shel silverstien


 
addi Posted: Fri Nov 11 06:57:50 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  antartica said:

>Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance - Robert Pirsig


I am shocked to see this on someone's list.

It's part of the trilogy of books that had the biggest influence on my life back in my college days.

the other two

Man's Search for Meaning (Victor Frankl)

Damien (Hermann Hesse)



 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:10:31 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  demian hermann hesse

catch 22 joseph heller

antyhing by bukowski

the plague camus (I always froget the English name, but I think that is it)

the poetry of charles baudelaire and certainly dylan thomas

anything by umberto echo

the unbearable lightness of being by kundera

there are a million more.

but i would just like to say that i am taking everyone's recommendations to heart and buying one from every list this weekend for plane reading. thanks. :D

(and also, howitzer, what have you been up to?! i'd love to hear all about it. seriously.)





 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:12:12 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  oh! also

the outsider by colin wilson.

a must.

and guns germs and steel... that's an interesting read. (by jared diamond)


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:13:23 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  (and also, matj, what've you been up to?! grin.)


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:22:07 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  (and i meant mat_j, underscore included. big grin.)


 
addi Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:28:59 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:

>and guns germs and steel... that's an interesting read. (by jared diamond)

Meg...Baby!

That's the last book I read. Neato!

(these day i read much more non-fiction than fiction)


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 07:37:20 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>beetlebum said:
>
>>and guns germs and steel... that's an interesting read. (by jared diamond)
>
>Meg...Baby!
>
>That's the last book I read. Neato!
>
>(these day i read much more non-fiction than fiction)

Agree? Disagree? What do you think of all of that?


 
addi Posted: Fri Nov 11 09:21:08 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:

>Agree? Disagree? What do you think of all of that?

You mean with the premise of the book?

(work with me...I'm slow)


 
this1dude Posted: Fri Nov 11 10:12:03 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  -The DaVinci Code
by:somebody i can't remember
-Nightmares and Dreamscapes
by:Stephen King


 
mat_j Posted: Fri Nov 11 10:14:42 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:
>demian hermann hesse
>
>catch 22 joseph heller
>
>antyhing by bukowski
>
>the plague camus (I always froget the English name, but I think that is it)
>
>the poetry of charles baudelaire and certainly dylan thomas
>
>anything by umberto echo
>
>the unbearable lightness of being by kundera
>
>there are a million more.
>
>but i would just like to say that i am taking everyone's recommendations to heart and buying one from every list this weekend for plane reading. thanks. :D
>
>(and also, howitzer, what have you been up to?! i'd love to hear all about it. seriously.)
>
>

Well for the last 2 minutes i've been loving the aobve collection of books, especially baudelaire and Dylan Thomas.


I've been busy, got a film deal with an indie company created by some mates of mine to get Fir my feature made, got a meeting tomorrow to discuss. As a matter of interest are you still living in the UK?


 
this1dude Posted: Fri Nov 11 10:24:10 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  no



 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 11:24:10 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>beetlebum said:
>>demian hermann hesse
>>
>>catch 22 joseph heller
>>
>>antyhing by bukowski
>>
>>the plague camus (I always froget the English name, but I think that is it)
>>
>>the poetry of charles baudelaire and certainly dylan thomas
>>
>>anything by umberto echo
>>
>>the unbearable lightness of being by kundera
>>
>>there are a million more.
>>
>>but i would just like to say that i am taking everyone's recommendations to heart and buying one from every list this weekend for plane reading. thanks. :D
>>
>>(and also, howitzer, what have you been up to?! i'd love to hear all about it. seriously.)
>>
>>
>
>Well for the last 2 minutes i've been loving the aobve collection of books, especially baudelaire and Dylan Thomas.
>
>
>I've been busy, got a film deal with an indie company created by some mates of mine to get Fir my feature made, got a meeting tomorrow to discuss. As a matter of interest are you still living in the UK?

Yup yup. You poor sods are stuck with me for another two years. :D


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 11:25:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  And also, woah mat_j! you are such a legend! (indie film company?! crikey. i have meetings with... other people... and stuff.)


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Nov 11 11:26:47 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>beetlebum said:
>
>>Agree? Disagree? What do you think of all of that?
>
>You mean with the premise of the book?
>
>(work with me...I'm slow)

yeah, the whole geography premise. anyway, you don't have to discuss. i was just curious. :D


 
antartica Posted: Fri Nov 11 11:50:45 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>antartica said:
>
>>Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance - Robert Pirsig
>
>
>I am shocked to see this on someone's list.
>
>It's part of the trilogy of books that had the biggest influence on my life back in my college days.
>
>the other two
>
>Man's Search for Meaning (Victor Frankl)
>
>Damien (Hermann Hesse)
>

i'll have to check em out =)


 
addi Posted: Fri Nov 11 12:21:38 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:

>yeah, the whole geography premise. anyway, you don't have to discuss. i was just curious. :D

I guess I do. I hate to sound so wishy-washy, but compared to Diamond I feel like such a mental peon. The amount of research and meticulous fact finding presented in the book is amazing.

Anyway his premise that the geography (natural resourses, grains and domesticatible wild animals) native to the area that people settled in being the main factor in determining superiority in technology, and not their predetermined intelligence seems very plausible to me.
Personally I was more interested in the historical facts he presented about the evolution of grain crops and the use and discovery of various metals for weaponry and tools. I found I had to read a little and then put the damn thing down just to mentally absorb the amount of information he was giving.



 
Mark Posted: Fri Nov 11 12:43:24 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Decipher - Stel Pavlou
(it's in the same category as the DaVincy Code I guess, but it is older and imho much better)

Also Sprache Zarathustra - Friedrich Nietzsche

The Egyptian Book of The Dead (if I could find out who wrote this I would be famous... lol)

No Logo - Naomi Klein

La rebelion de las Masas - Jose Ortega Y Gasset (English title would be something like: The Uprising of the Hordes)


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Nov 11 16:46:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh yes, Guns Germs and Steel

And Life of Pi

Thanks ant and beetlebum for remindering me.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Nov 11 16:46:59 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  this 1 dude said:
>no
>

Yes.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Nov 11 16:47:40 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  meshuggah said:
>
>remindering


reminding*


 
Ed Posted: Fri Nov 11 20:14:25 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Johnny, the Homicidal Maniac by Jhonen Vasquez
Fuck yeah

2001: A Space Odyssey, and the sequels

Amphigorey by Edward Gorey

Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? by Phillip Dick


I'm waiting for Lenny Bruce Is Dead in paperback. :(


 
JesusOnline Posted: Fri Nov 11 22:26:51 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The Man in the High Castle

On The Road

Middlesex (and the virgin suicides as well I'd advise)

I could/probably even should give authors and such like, but it's 03:26am and I'm working an asshole nightshift. Needless to say I'm not in the mood


 
Silentmind Posted: Fri Nov 11 23:11:33 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Well, seeing as I mostly read non-fiction, here they are...

Shake Hands with the Devil-Roméo A. Dallaire

The Origin of Species- Charles Darwin

The Second World War- John Keegan

Leap of Faith- Gordon Cooper

The Prince and The Art of War- Niccolò Machiavelli

Paris 1919 Margaret MacMillian

If you're into space photography and a great pictoral look at the history of spaceflight:

Space-Andrew Chalkin


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Nov 12 00:51:55 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:

>I'm waiting for Lenny Bruce Is Dead in paperback.

yesss!


 
*m*a*s* Posted: Sun Nov 13 12:51:57 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  "The Prophet" - Kahlil Gibran
"Ishmael" - Daniel Quinn


 
*m*a*s* Posted: Sun Nov 13 12:53:09 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  antartica said:
>and how can i forget "the giving tree" - shel silverstien


SADDEST BOOK EVER! My dad read it to me when I was like 4 years old, and I still cry everytime I read it.


 
misszero Posted: Mon Nov 14 07:24:33 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  >this 1 dude said:
> by:Stephen King

nice to see a little stephen, I was going to recommend The Stand by him. Its a very interesting premise for one thing, but just a really easy book to read (even at 600+ pages). I'd also recommend Eleanor Rigby by Douglas Coupland, that Canadian dude. The characters in it were endearing and quirky, pretty much indicative of coupland. nice stuff.


 
addi Posted: Mon Nov 14 07:32:20 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  (non-topic post)

I is SO good to see you here, misszero!


 
JesusOnline Posted: Mon Nov 14 17:42:59 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  misszero said:

>nice to see a little stephen, I was going to recommend The Stand by him. Its a very interesting premise for one thing, but just a really easy book to read (even at 600+ pages).

Really? I like Stephen King a lot, but the stand would be one book I find very much overrated. I found it a slog to complete and genreally quite uninteresting.
I'd reccomend It or the shining if I was loaning out a stephen king book to a friend - maybe even Carrie.


 
antartica Posted: Mon Nov 14 18:17:23 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  JesusOnline said:
>Really? I like Stephen King a lot, but the stand would be one book I find very much overrated. I found it a slog to complete and genreally quite uninteresting.
>I'd reccomend It or the shining if I was loaning out a stephen king book to a friend - maybe even Carrie.

my stephen king recommendation would be IT


 
JesusOnline Posted: Mon Nov 14 20:33:00 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  JesusOnline said:
>misszero said:
>
>>nice to see a little stephen, I was going to recommend The Stand by him. Its a very interesting premise for one thing, but just a really easy book to read (even at 600+ pages).
>
>Really? I like Stephen King a lot, but the stand would be one book I find very much overrated. I found it a slog to complete and genreally quite uninteresting.
>I'd reccomend It or the shining if I was loaning out a stephen king book to a friend - maybe even Carrie.

Nightshift and spelling don't match, I guess.
IT is his best book, detailed and thrilling.


 
antartica Posted: Mon Nov 14 21:30:46 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  *growling* they all float....
they all float down here....


 
mat_j Posted: Thu Nov 17 08:55:48 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:
>And also, woah mat_j! you are such a legend! (indie film company?! crikey. i have meetings with... other people... and stuff.)

Ah it's not as glam as it sounds, three guys sitting in a pub, talking about the merits of Michael Bey, then on the way home i made friends with a balding dog.


 
beetlebum Posted: Thu Nov 17 13:24:47 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>beetlebum said:
>>And also, woah mat_j! you are such a legend! (indie film company?! crikey. i have meetings with... other people... and stuff.)
>
>Ah it's not as glam as it sounds, three guys sitting in a pub, talking about the merits of Michael Bey, then on the way home i made friends with a balding dog.

That's *still* more interesting than my life. How'd it go?


 
mat_j Posted: Tue Nov 22 20:38:38 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:
>mat_j said:
>>beetlebum said:
>>>And also, woah mat_j! you are such a legend! (indie film company?! crikey. i have meetings with... other people... and stuff.)
>>
>>Ah it's not as glam as it sounds, three guys sitting in a pub, talking about the merits of Michael Bey, then on the way home i made friends with a balding dog.
>
>That's *still* more interesting than my life. How'd it go?

The balding dog never called back


 
beetlebum Posted: Wed Nov 23 03:23:12 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>beetlebum said:
>>mat_j said:
>>>beetlebum said:
>>>>And also, woah mat_j! you are such a legend! (indie film company?! crikey. i have meetings with... other people... and stuff.)
>>>
>>>Ah it's not as glam as it sounds, three guys sitting in a pub, talking about the merits of Michael Bey, then on the way home i made friends with a balding dog.
>>
>>That's *still* more interesting than my life. How'd it go?
>
>The balding dog never called back

Woe! It was the dog's loss, I'm sure of it.

Reading those mysteries you recommended. Right on.


 
iggy Posted: Wed Nov 23 05:50:11 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  the little prince
message in a bottle
morrie: in his own words



 
misszero Posted: Mon Nov 28 23:35:47 2005 Post | Quote in Reply  
  yeah, i do like It also (re-read that right after i finished re-reading the Stand. Only been finished a few days), but there's something about 'new society' books that really tickles my fancy. You know, books like The Day Of The Trffids, and stuff like that where they have to form a new society and find new ways of doing things. for some reason, i really enjoy them. To me, The Stand seems to have a slightly different vibe to a lot of other King that I've read, i guess its subjective as to whether that's positive or negative.

and p.s. i've been missing you addi. *grin*


 



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