Generation Terrorists » Forum
Sign up   |   Start new thread   |   Lost password?   |   Edit profile   |   Member List   |   myGT   |   Blog
Keyword
From
To
 

Politicization of a funeral
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Feb 13 08:32:03 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Seems like just a few months ago, I was taken to task and labelled a hypocrite for lamenting the very thing this article is speaking to.

http://www.townhall.com/opinion/columns/StarParker/2006/02/13/186113.html


 
Posted: Mon Feb 13 11:10:14 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh boy. A Star Parker article. Just what I like starting my day off with.

Alright, a couple things. Firstly, she seems to draw a lot of conclusions about what is said; perhaps the eulogy or transcripts show different from what she wrote, but the gist of it seems to look as follows:

Rev. Joseph Lowery: "For war, billions more, but no more for the poor?"

Star Parker: "Lowery must have some way to blame President Bush for the fact that although blacks constitute 13.5 percent of the U.S. population, they account for 47 percent of the million Americans with HIV infection. Or to point to Republicans as the cause of HIV/AIDS rates being 19 times higher among black women than among white women and seven times higher among black men than among white men."


And this is how she continues to write. She draws massively overblown conclusions about what was meant, when what was said was significantly less ugly.

I'll agree with you here, hif: this is not the place to play politics.

But then, one must think: Is there any good that can come out of orating a speech of this high a calibre? Certainly, if done properly.

In a sense: You can only call Lowery a partisan or anti-republican if it's against the Republican agenda to be charitable to the poor.

And with their track record, this isn't too off base: Bush has continuously cut the taxes on the richest 1% of the American Economy (these 1%, by the way, control 38% of the American wealth. Sounds like they need a break! PS: 38% is the highest margin of wealth garnered by the richest 1% of any country currently in the world).

Some more stats?

Between 1979 and 1997, the income for the richest 1% of Americans rose 157%, the income for the middle (20%-80%) richest Americans rose only 5%, and the poorest 20%'s income has actually fallen as the country's gotten richer.

According to Fortune magazine, In 1970, the average American CEO of a company made approximately 39 times what his average salary worker made. In 1999, the average American CEO makes 1002 times what his average salary worker makes.

So is there a gap in wealth distribution and, let's be realistic, overall quality of life? Equality for life horizons between communities?

Of course there is a gap. Star Parker chooses to put the blame on the leaders of the black community (Only the leftist ones, though. Not like she'd ever make a political move against a black rightwinger, like say, Tony Evans), and on the black community itself, for having too many single-parent homes and broken families.

And let me say: if Rev. Lowery saying that more money needs to be spent on the poor is pulpit-politics for the left, then saying that the dissolution of the family unit is pulpit-politics for the right. Both are guilty.

If there was any proof needed that Parker is little more than a right-wing pundit: "Anybody that believes in separation of church and state needs to leave right now." - Star Parker


With that, I'll leave you. I am a volunteer at the homeless shelter here in beautiful downtown Windsor, where our homeless crisis in the aftermath of the tourist season in Detroit has left a good many more than usual to struggle for the overall lack of necessary goods to survive.




 
Posted: Mon Feb 13 11:11:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  PS: for what it's worth, please read this. Both the article hif posted and what I've written, even though they are both pretty long (my attention span's dwindled, too), I think there is a very real lesson to be learned in all of this.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Feb 13 11:45:06 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I don't make any assumptions as to the accuracy of Ms. Parkers article, I was merely trying to make the point that politiking at a funeral is lowbrow skunk stuff and it has been done twice now with Rosa Parks and then with Coretta Scott King.
Maybe you don't agree with Ms. Parkers politics but you must agree with the gist of her article that what they did at King's funeral was despicable.

As for your stats, anyone can find stats to make their point.
That is for another thread.


 
Posted: Mon Feb 13 17:51:34 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>I don't make any assumptions as to the accuracy of Ms. Parkers article, I was merely trying to make the point that politiking at a funeral is lowbrow skunk stuff and it has been done twice now with Rosa Parks and then with Coretta Scott King.
>Maybe you don't agree with Ms. Parkers politics but you must agree with the gist of her article that what they did at King's funeral was despicable.
>
>As for your stats, anyone can find stats to make their point.
>That is for another thread.

see, I don't think what they did was overly wrong. From the article, it seems that they made only minor allusions to a political cause. A political cause, by the way, that the person being eulogized stood behind.

It seems a lot closer to "justified" than it does "despicable".


 
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Feb 13 19:41:34 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>I don't make any assumptions as to the accuracy of Ms. Parkers article, I was merely trying to make the point that politiking at a funeral is lowbrow skunk stuff and it has been done twice now with Rosa Parks and then with Coretta Scott King.
>>Maybe you don't agree with Ms. Parkers politics but you must agree with the gist of her article that what they did at King's funeral was despicable.
>>
>>As for your stats, anyone can find stats to make their point.
>>That is for another thread.
>
>see, I don't think what they did was overly wrong. From the article, it seems that they made only minor allusions to a political cause. A political cause, by the way, that the person being eulogized stood behind.
>
>It seems a lot closer to "justified" than it does "despicable".
>
I disagree, I don't think Mrs. King would necessarily be in agreement with all the crap that was spewed there.
I could almost guarantee that Martin Luther King is spinning in his grave over what has become of his civil rights movement.
Tell me, what do you think that Mrs. King thought of the 70% illegitimacy rate of the black community ?
Did she really believe more money from Bush would help the poor blacks more than a change of culture ? Considering that Dubya has spent more on welfare entitlements than any other president in history ?
I doubt it.


 
Silentmind Posted: Mon Feb 13 21:29:53 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
>
>As for your stats, anyone can find stats to make their point.
>That is for another thread.

Just as the author of this article did. The idea put forth here is a sound one' leave the politics for the political realm. However, such use of the funeral is to be expected. We cannot deny that Coretta Scott King and Rosa Parks were political people. I'm sure many could post a eulogy that was as politicized as this one is said to be, from the left and from the right of the political spectrum. You live and die in the political realm, and you play by its rules. Your death may just further the career aspirations and political agenda of someone else.

In regards to the article, the author is guilty of the same offence she charges others with. She has used the funeral just as those that delivered the eulogy did. Seems to me that if she really had a problem with using a funeral for political gain, she would have had a tribute to Mrs. King. But, alas, she didn't. Seems she's guilty of that same "tasteless politicization of Coretta Scott King's funeral"

I can't disagree with hif on this one as a funeral should be used to honor the person, not use their funeral to further political aims. However, it does happen.


 
DanSRose Posted: Mon Feb 13 23:16:48 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I think this was the perfect place to make a politcal speech. Coretta Scott King was a trailblazing civil rights fighters before she met her husband. She dies and we forget her mission?
Why waste our time and her memory by saying how totally awesome she was, instead of acting on her message? How can you say a leader is a great person and choose not follow their lead? A freedom fighter who led the charge in her later years against institutionalized racism.
Especially if the Man who is most powerful person in America is sitting 10-feet behind you.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Feb 14 06:48:12 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>I think this was the perfect place to make a politcal speech. Coretta Scott King was a trailblazing civil rights fighters before she met her husband. She dies and we forget her mission?
>Why waste our time and her memory by saying how totally awesome she was, instead of acting on her message? How can you say a leader is a great person and choose not follow their lead? A freedom fighter who led the charge in her later years against institutionalized racism.
>Especially if the Man who is most powerful person in America is sitting 10-feet behind you.
>
Because it's disrespectful to use her funeral as a showcase to score political points for yourself instead of honoring her life.
These were political attacks on a sitting president who has nothing to do with their perceived plight.

Besides, I thought Ryan Seacrest was the most powerful man in America.


 
DanSRose Posted: Tue Feb 14 09:41:00 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The "percieved plight" of African Americans is systemetic. It's everything from the severing of the educational system to putting the inept in charge of massive recovery that has just evicted almost all of the Katrina evacuees in Texas (because when a couple of thousand people all come into a city all at once, it's pretty easy to find a job and get a new place of residence) to a lack of adequeate health coverage regarding HIV and things in general to, well I'm going to stop now bcause you get the point.
It's systemic because it is part of the system. You are not a racist (no one here is), but simply being White in America means you are privledged in a way that being Black you are not. And it is not right and it is not fair.
And the Man who is both an active power in the System and a power who is in the position to change it.

I'd rather follow the lead of a great power than pontificate of how great she was. It's what she would have wanted, to take the fight and the message to how far it should go.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Feb 14 10:07:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>The "percieved plight" of African Americans is systemetic. It's everything from the severing of the educational system to putting the inept in charge of massive recovery that has just evicted almost all of the Katrina evacuees in Texas (because when a couple of thousand people all come into a city all at once, it's pretty easy to find a job and get a new place of residence) to a lack of adequeate health coverage regarding HIV and things in general to, well I'm going to stop now bcause you get the point.
>It's systemic because it is part of the system. You are not a racist (no one here is), but simply being White in America means you are privledged in a way that being Black you are not. And it is not right and it is not fair.
>And the Man who is both an active power in the System and a power who is in the position to change it.
>
>I'd rather follow the lead of a great power than pontificate of how great she was. It's what she would have wanted, to take the fight and the message to how far it should go.
>
If you want to follow her lead, then go into the trouble spots and try to change their attitude. Make them realize that education is more important than gangbanging.
Make them realize that handguns are not fashion accessories.
Make them realized that fathering children and then leaving does not make you a real man.
Make them realize that hard work is more important than making your peers think you are a dangerous mutha fucka.
Do all of the above and you will follow her lead.
Perpetuate the "I am a victim" gospel of those pretenders at her funeral and you will follow their leads.
>
I don't think you know any more than I do, what she would have wanted, but I do know that funerals traditionally held to celebrate the life of the deceased and not to be turned into a circus for the advantage of the clowns that are speaking.



 
DanSRose Posted: Tue Feb 14 11:32:31 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  What gang culture is the option "they" have left when "they" have no other options.
Do you think that those people want to join a gang? That it's either joining the firm or getting into MS-13, but being a lawyer isn't the action packed career you went to school for?
It ends up a question of survival Because the system of our government and society has set up has allowed for the spread of gangs, HIV, urban decay and every other type of social disease.
That was Coretta Scott King's fight. It's being ignored everywhere else, so why not bring it up at her memorial?


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Feb 14 12:12:25 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>What gang culture is the option "they" have left when "they" have no other options.
>Do you think that those people want to join a gang? That it's either joining the firm or getting into MS-13, but being a lawyer isn't the action packed career you went to school for?
>It ends up a question of survival Because the system of our government and society has set up has allowed for the spread of gangs, HIV, urban decay and every other type of social disease.
>That was Coretta Scott King's fight. It's being ignored everywhere else, so why not bring it up at her memorial?
>
I don't think I've ever heard of anyone that was forced into a gang.
The American black community is by itself the 9 largest economy in the world.
American black people enjoy the richest, highest standard of living of any blacks anywhere in the world.
They have the same opportunities as the latinos and the asians, and for that matter you and me.
You just have to want it bad enough.
Ms. King knew that. So did her husband.
They didn't go through life asking for the government to give them more money.
They only wanted equal opportunities.
No government will ever wipe out racism, and every other social disease.
It's not our system of government, they exist under every know system of government so how can you blame just one ?

So, by your logic, it would have been ok to turn Ronald Reagans funeral into a hatefest directed at the democrats ?
Instead of celebrating his life ?

What about turning Ariel Sharon's impending funeral into a hatefest directed at the Arabs ?


 
FN Posted: Tue Feb 14 12:19:29 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>You are not a racist (no one here is)

I'm a cultural racist


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Feb 15 22:26:17 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>DanSRose said:
>>You are not a racist (no one here is)
>
>I'm a cultural racist

Yeah. Except for Christophe. He hates most everyone, especially if they like that rap music those kids are all into these day.

>American black people enjoy the richest, highest standard of living of any blacks anywhere in the world.

I know! All those subway trips through Brooklyn and getting lost through lesser DC and PG County, Maryland has shown me the exact wealth and prosperity Black Americans roll in today

>You just have to want it bad enough.
I started about 4 witty retorts to that, but no. I got nothin'. That's single handedly one of the most ridiculous things I have ever heard/read from anyone, including and especially myself.



 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Feb 16 13:33:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Showtime at Coretta Scott King's funeral
By Larry Elder

Feb 16, 2006


The "funeral" of Coretta Scott King turned into an ugly, disrespectful political rally.

Rev. Joseph Lowery, co-founder -- along with Martin Luther King Jr. -- of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, castigated President George W. Bush for insufficient disaster relief, failing to provide health care and failing to cure poverty. "We know now there were no weapons of mass destruction over there," said Lowery. "But Coretta knew and we know that there are weapons of misdirection right down here. Millions without health insurance. Poverty abounds. For war, billions more, but no more for the poor."

Listening to speaker after speaker complain about the poor conditions under which minorities live, one wonders whether Martin Luther King Jr. accomplished anything at all.

There stood Oprah Winfrey, the most powerful woman in television, with her net worth estimated by Forbes magazine at $1.3 billion. And she recently signed a $55 million deal with XM Satellite Radio. There stood poet Maya Angelou, who, in one recent year, grossed $3.3 million according to Forbes, and lives in a mansion while employing several people full time. There stood Shirley Franklin, the black female mayor of the city of Atlanta. There stood former presidential candidate Rev. Al Sharpton, a man who once called Jews "diamond merchants" and denounced a white Harlem storeowner as a "white interloper." A man whom many still take seriously despite falsely accusing a man of rape, and despite the existence of a 1983 FBI surveillance tape showing Sharpton discussing, with an undercover agent, a deal to traffic cocaine. And, of course, Jesse Jackson spoke -- a multimillionaire with two sons who own an Anheuser-Busch beer distributorship, and another son who serves as a U.S. congressman from the Chicago area.

Bernice King, one of Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King's daughters, gave the eulogy. Did she really complain about "materialism"? For the King family members -- if the sale at Sotheby's goes through -- may net $30 million for their father's papers. The family also owns copyrights on many of MLK's speeches, including the "I Have a Dream" speech. The Kings sued CBS for airing part of the "I Have a Dream" speech and sued "USA Today" for reprinting the speech's text. CBS ultimately settled the lawsuit by making a donation to the King Center, and "USA Today" had to issue an apology along with their settlement.

Most blacks are middle class and do not live in the inner city. If black America were a separate country, its GDP would place it at No. 16 in the world. Corporations like Time Warner, American Express and Merrill Lynch all have black CEOs.

Is Tiger Woods not the world's No. 1 golfer? And say it ain't so, but didn't Snoop Dogg cut a Chrysler commercial? And sociologist Nathan Glazer says studies show three out of four blacks, with SAT scores between 1250 and 1299, receive admissions into the nation's most elite colleges, yet only one in four whites with comparable SAT scores receive admission.

And isn't this 2006, with black candidates like Michael Steele, the lieutenant governor of Maryland, now running for the U.S. Senate? And isn't Ken Blackwell, Ohio's black secretary of state, running for governor? And what about Lynn Swann, the former Pittsburgh Steelers great, who just got the Republican nod for Pennsylvania's gubernatorial race? What about back-to-back black secretaries of State, one of whom, Condoleezza Rice, many hope and wish would run for president? Polls show over 90 percent of whites would vote for a qualified black presidential candidate, versus one-third in 1958.

America, while not perfect, certainly has come a long, long way since the day King led the Montgomery bus boycott. But the funeral speakers confuse equal rights with equal results -- two very different things. UCLA public policy professor emeritus James Q. Wilson once said, "You need only do three things to avoid poverty in this country: finish high school, marry before having a child, and produce the child after the age of 20. Only 8 percent of families who do this are poor; 79 percent of those who fail to do this are poor." Yet today's "black leaders" demand reparations, set-asides, race-based preferences, and still more welfare.

In 1911, Booker T. Washington seemed to address some of those who spoke at the funeral when he said, "There is [a] class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs -- partly because they want sympathy, and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs. . . . There is a certain class of race-problem solvers who don't want the patient to get well, because as long as the disease holds out they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public."






 



[ Reply to this thread ] [ Start new thread ]