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Which country to invade next
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 07:35:57 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2587661313510275113


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 07:40:54 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1002154704

So the question rises, do you guys get any biology or geography at all or what's up with that?


School is compulsory too, no?

(seriously)


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 08:09:29 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  sigh

thanks Christophe
Might as well title that video "How I lost my faith in Democracy"

To be sure every country has their share of morons (Belgium included), but sometimes it seems to me that America was "blessed" with a disproportional amount of them.

I know that that interviewer had many people give him relatively intelligent answers that were edited out (doesn't make for interesting footage), but even with that it is sad, and disturbing, that there are people walking free out there like that...and some of them actually vote.



 
DanSRose Posted: Fri Mar 10 08:55:43 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  That's what you get from the MTV.
Also I think this dude found the stupidest in LA, but it is LA so it is less hard than you think. And they picked a lot of tourists. God I hate tourists, and I imagine the ones who go to Los Angeles are that much worse.


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 11:36:43 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>To be sure every country has their share of morons (Belgium included)

No doubt, but I can tell you this:

I'm willing to bet *serious* money on it that you can ask 1000 people here (not talking about the foreign people) and not one of them would make that kind of geographical errors...

Which is why I asked if school is compulsory or not? I always thought it was?



And about the non-evolution theory thing, I read a poll about it a while ago, the non-darwinists were under 5% or something


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 11:45:33 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>I'm willing to bet *serious* money on it that you can ask 1000 people here (not talking about the foreign people) and not one of them would make that kind of geographical errors...

not defending the morons in the video at all, but...

Population of Belgium..10 million

Population of U.S. 296 million

think about it


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 12:37:45 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Does that change the random 1000 people? ;o)

I'd say the chance of encountering a moron or normal person would be the same no matter how big the population is.



And still, is school compulsory or not?


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 12:52:44 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Does that change the random 1000 people? ;o)
>
>I'd say the chance of encountering a moron or normal person would be the same no matter how big the population is.

I understand what you're point is, but I disagree to some extent.
It's easier to cook for 4 than it is for 400.
Quality control is easier in education for 10 million than it is for 297 million citizens.

>And still, is school compulsory or not?

Yes...up to age 16
Physically they have to be there.
Mentally too many have checked out.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 10 12:55:24 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>
>And still, is school compulsory or not?
>
School is compulsory until age 16.
Geography is not taught now like it was when I was in high school.
I think most young Americans have a miserable knowledge of world geography.
That doesn't make them morons either.


 
libra Posted: Fri Mar 10 13:07:13 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Christophe said:
>>

>I think most young Americans have a miserable knowledge of world geography.
>That doesn't make them morons either.

it makes them morons if they're not willing to correct their lack of education by looking at a map every once in a while...and not all the people in that video were young...


 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 13:13:09 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  School is required until you turn 16, or 10th grade.

To his each according to his own abilities.

Not a single of those people in the video are making any choices regarding the foreign or domestic policies of the state, outside of how to flip a cheese burger or maybe ensuring their company ships goods to the right locations(or other, lower rung of the ladder job where one only follows directions.) In their private lives, i'm sure they're doing damn well fine. They don't need to go home and study geography, because they're content in their life as it is. ALthough not knowing australia is pretty damned funny, it has no affect on them(or anyone else in the world, outside of a navigator), but the next time they need to walk to australia, they're sure fucked! huh, huh?

What i'm saying is, it's not very important if these people have that education, and while they might have taken geography in 7th grade, and done just fine on their world map test, they've realized, subconsciously or not, that they're not deciding where to go to war to aid the needs of the states. So, yes, a lot of that information(useless to them) has slipped out the wayside of their brain, leaked out like everyone knows so many memories do.

Our country actually has paid for by the state representatives, people who do think politics as a full time job, so the rest of us don't have to. Yes, these dumb asses elect them, and that's a shame, but to at least get involved in politics(from a required official standpoint) requires some sort of heartfelt passion/desire to help the state and world, which means at least something.

besides, having gone to school, and having read scholarly articles on all sorts of topics from the slums of america to why the movie "alien" represents the fear men have of woman's rise to power, I can tell you first hand that the US is not short on intelligent people(albeit often paranoid people, but that's a different story) I wish I could tell you some sort of numbers, some comparison to your belgium, but i don't have those numbers. Basically, we have some really smart fuckers over here so take it easy on the hate. That's all.

I could rant for a while on the idiots also, but that'd be just fueling the fire.


 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 13:35:14 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:

>To his each according to his own abilities.
>

this was supposed to read, "TO each, according to his own abilities." I think it's Socrates or Marx who said it, but there have been a lot of spin offs.

>Our country actually has paid for by the state representatives, people who do think politics as a full time job, so the rest of us don't have to. Yes, these dumb asses elect them, and that's a shame, but to at least get involved in politics(from a required official standpoint) requires some sort of heartfelt passion/desire to help the state and world, which means at least something.
>

Above, I wanted to stress that these elected officials got into politics primarily for a passion to change their society, whatever the size, and generally have positive motives.

sorry for the misclarity.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 10 13:36:05 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>Christophe said:
>>>
>
>>I think most young Americans have a miserable knowledge of world geography.
>>That doesn't make them morons either.
>
>it makes them morons if they're not willing to correct their lack of education by looking at a map every once in a while...and not all the people in that video were young...
>
Your definition of young is different than mine, and don't forget that video was obviously edited. I'm sure they found plenty of folks that could read a map and just didn't include them in the video.



 
libra Posted: Fri Mar 10 13:56:17 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:

>>
>
>Above, I wanted to stress that these elected officials got into politics primarily for a passion to change their society, whatever the size, and generally have positive motives.
>

or because of the revolving door...


"A democracy is an asembly of mature people and not a collection of sheep guided by a small clique of know-it-alls"
- P. Feyerabend

"I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesom discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power."
-T. Jefferson

those pretty much sum up what I was thinking of saying in a much clearer way...


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 14:29:43 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>I understand what you're point is

"your", addi

Your brain is liquifying too! ;o)


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 14:36:09 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:
>I wish I could tell you some sort of numbers, some comparison to your belgium, but i don't have those numbers. Basically, we have some really smart fuckers over here so take it easy on the hate. That's all.

Take it easy there cowboy, I never said there aren't any morons here, I said most people know geography better than that here and are not that big on non-scientificly proven theories due to compulsory schooling untill the age of 18.

I was surprised to see that people either believe that kind of stuff seriously in such high numbers and that even australia (could it get any more distinct on a world map?) wasn't known to them location-wise, which made me wonder if they had had any schooling at all, nothing more, nothing less.


 
Mouse Posted: Fri Mar 10 14:40:12 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I am literally in tears right now.
Australia?! Come the fuck on people.
I can say with complete confidence that I could have located most of the locations those people mentioned. Then I again I give a shit and look at maps once in a while, which I'm guessing those particular individuals don't do. Get a globe, people!

Thank goodness for GTers, we may all have different views and come from different places, but we're all fairly aware, which is refreshing to come into from the everyday world.


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 14:41:51 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Also, I think it does matter since when these people vote a lot of the voting is probably based on war-related stuff


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 14:43:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>addi said:
>>I understand what you're point is
>
>"your", addi
>
>Your brain is liquifying too! ;o)

I seem to be always fucking up on "your" and "you're" these days. Perhaps because I think more about the content of my post and not the grammar.
Forgive me


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 15:00:44 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:

>I could rant for a while on the idiots also, but that'd be just fueling the fire.

Rant, dammit, rant!
It's good to see you around again.

And while knowing geography isn't a matter of life and death, I think it's symtamatic of a more serious problem...a lack of knowledge in other important areas.
A generalization, but something tells me the people interviewed could have told us all about the latest hollywood star gossip, who's still left on American Idol, the tricks to get to the next level on Halo, or what brands of shirts are now hip and which are lame to be seen in.
My concern isn't so much that they found clueless people on geography, but that too many people haven't been taught to use their brains...to reason and think and be rational.
I'm with Libra. I don't want our form of democracy left in the hands of these people, whether they're republican or democrats. I certainly don't want to leave it to the professional politicians to run the government unchecked either. A vital democracy depends on a majority of informed citizens to be healthy.

See...ranting is easy :)


 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 16:07:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>Asswipe said:
>
>>>
>>
>>Above, I wanted to stress that these elected officials got into politics primarily for a passion to change their society, whatever the size, and generally have positive motives.
>>
>
>or because of the revolving door...

maybe. but not the ones i've personally met.

>
>
>"A democracy is an asembly of mature people and not a collection of sheep guided by a small clique of know-it-alls"
>- P. Feyerabend

we don't live in a democracy, thankfully.

>
>"I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesom discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power."
>-T. Jefferson
>
>those pretty much sum up what I was thinking of saying in a much clearer way...

Oh, so hopeful. I think people are here to reproduce and take care of their offspring, little more. not much time to be educated in the ways of foreign policy or geography when you've got kids to make and feed. is there something wrong with that? yes.


 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 16:15:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Asswipe said:
>>I wish I could tell you some sort of numbers, some comparison to your belgium, but i don't have those numbers. Basically, we have some really smart fuckers over here so take it easy on the hate. That's all.
>
>Take it easy there cowboy, I never said there aren't any morons here, I said most people know geography better than that here and are not that big on non-scientificly proven theories due to compulsory schooling untill the age of 18.
>
>I was surprised to see that people either believe that kind of stuff seriously in such high numbers and that even australia (could it get any more distinct on a world map?) wasn't known to them location-wise, which made me wonder if they had had any schooling at all, nothing more, nothing less.

uhhhhhh, look at the idiots run!

to answer your totally unweighted question, maybe they had schooling, maybe not. I'd not be suprised if some of them did not ever learn where australia was in the first place. cause, yes, some people drop out of school to sell drugs and some people sleep through geography because they were up late partying. and others, though probably fewer, don't know australia for better reasons.

as for the religious beliefs. I didn't read your article!!!! but I can assure you that most of the people who do believe in a higher power do not give a damned about what he'd preach, and probably don't go to church. so they believe in god the same way they believe in australia--maybe it's out there somewhere, and maybe it'll oen day be of use, but not just yet. my point? damned if i know.


 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 16:31:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>Asswipe said:
>
>>I could rant for a while on the idiots also, but that'd be just fueling the fire.
>
>Rant, dammit, rant!
>It's good to see you around again.

thank ya, kindly.

>
>And while knowing geography isn't a matter of life and death, I think it's symtamatic of a more serious problem...a lack of knowledge in other important areas.
> A generalization, but something tells me the people interviewed could have told us all about the latest hollywood star gossip, who's still left on American Idol, the tricks to get to the next level on Halo, or what brands of shirts are now hip and which are lame to be seen in.

I think you're very right. They are surely more informed on pop culture than on other affairs.

>My concern isn't so much that they found clueless people on geography, but that too many people haven't been taught to use their brains...to reason and think and be rational.

I'm sure, like you said, they think just plenty amounts about all of your pop culture stuff that you just mentioned. But the problem seems to be where we are focusing our brain efforts. Me? I could tell you a hell of a lot more about pop culture information than i could about current events and gripes with the world. I'm sedated by all of the sparkle and glitter, especially of video games, but that's my own story. So i can relate w/ these people. I guess, my question is, where do they/we find the time to be educated w/ all of this working to take care of all of our babys and baby's mamas on our hands? And then there's the temptation to just sit back and be enthralled by the television or vacations to the beach or video games, or whatever else people are spending their time doing. Instead of educating themselves. Cause it is so hard to care when we do have our pop gossip and our own fucked up lives to dwell about.


>I'm with Libra. I don't want our form of democracy left in the hands of these people, whether they're republican or democrats. I certainly don't want to leave it to the professional politicians to run the government unchecked either. A vital democracy depends on a majority of informed citizens to be healthy.

I am somewhat intrigued by you saying "healthy" there, instead of educated. But, i don't know. I guess I don't know how educated you can expect the majority of masses to be, since it is a full time job to handle your own affairs, much less, everyone elses'. And, like I said, the US is a republic, not a democracy--we are a country ruled by a band of elected officials. Granted, we do the electing, and can even be the elected, if we choose to get involved, but I suppose I don't know what this means in terms of power and abilities.

And, as for healthy. Asides from a mental educated healthiness, i can see how other areas of healthiness do affect our abilities to get involved, and that might be interesting to investigate.

>
>See...ranting is easy :)

cheers


 
Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:01:25 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Dear Everybody,

You are not your country.

Sincerely,
Crim.

------

If your country is largely uneducated, but you are brilliant, then what does it matter? you are brilliant.

If your country is fairly well educated, but you are an imbecile, then what does it matter? you are an imbecile.

What I am trying to get at: people use this sort of patriotism / antipatriotism to make the claim that a country is foolish, or that their country is better.

We should concentrate on bettering ourselves.

People who think that Australia is France aren't the type of people we need to waste worry on.


 
Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:03:40 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  PS: I hate coming home from work/school to find out that I'm some twenty posts late to get into an argument.

I need to start GTing on my mobile phone :D


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:10:19 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Asswipe said:

>And, as for healthy. Asides from a mental educated healthiness, i can see how other areas of healthiness do affect our abilities to get involved, and that might be interesting to investigate.

Damn, that was good to read. You were missed.

To clarify...I think we've become mentally lazy. I'm including myself. Perhaps it's a result of so many products and machines at our fingertips making life earsier than our forefathers had it. Poor or wealthy, we're surrounded by them. In one sense we no longer get up each day and work for our literal survival; we get up each day, put in 8 hours of work at a mindnumbing job, so we can afford to buy these "things" that will make life more fun and easier.
It's too easy to blame it all on material items, but sometimes I think our drive for a more entertaining, pleasure filled, and easier life is our downfall.

Now off to go kill a few more brain cells on some delicious margaritas.



 
Mesh Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:36:34 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Yeah, but how many people did they interview who were'nt complete twits that they just edited out? The whole point of doing that in the first place seems to have been to make (some) americans look dumb, so of course that's the result they ended up with.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:41:26 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  So, what do you think the results would be if we interviewed say 1000 Belgians and asked them to show us on a map where Texas was, do you think we could make a similar video ?


 
JesusOnline Posted: Fri Mar 10 17:59:42 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm not saying that that video did indeed pick out some of the dumber people in the United States, it's by no means a reflection on the rest of it. Lets face it, there are dumb people in all walks of life.

While, I could point out australia on the map, and would have no difficulty locating Paris or Lyon, nevermind just the whole of France.
But I never did like Geography and dropped it as soon as I possible could (at around 14) taking up other subjects which I enjoyed. I therefore couldn't point ou where Iran was to be honest - I could probably guess reasonably well mind.
But Having never been to the USA, and not having seriously looked at a map of it in years, I could not tell you where Texas or Nevada are. This may well be a reflextion on me - showing that I honestly don't care where they are.

I only know where North and South Korea are because of a computer game I've played when I was a kid, otherwise I'd look as dumb as anyone when asked to point it out on a map.
But truthfully, I don't care where it is.


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:18:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Belgium isn't making allusions at invading Texas, for starters.

I'm guessing if the question is "which country to invade next" the minimum would be knowing where it is.

Texas isn't a seperate continent, that might also be a bit of a problem.

Texas isn't *nearly* as much in the news as something like iran and company.



Also, just to specify: I'm not the one making this a nation vs nation thing, but as you wish:

To answer your question: I'm quite assured that out of the 1000 you'd have about 50 who can at least give you the general area of it (give or take a state), yes.

However, if you're going to ask 1000 Belgians where Australia is, I'd say the success rate would probably be around the 95-100% mark. Actually, there's not a doubt in my mind.

Iran, Iraq, North Korea and such are just as foreign to a European as to an American so I have no idea what you're getting at with the Texas thing, especially considering texas isn't a seperate country but one of 50 states of a country, that's a bit like me asking you to point out 1 specific half of a european country (25 countries vs 50 states).

Given the fact though that the US is at war with one of those, and the other is a neihgbour, you'd expect more americans to know the location than belgians.

To keep with the 1000 people thing, I'm willing to put my hand into the fire for it when I say that out of those 1000, at the very least 500 would know where iran and iraq are (some of which might mix the 2 up though). North Korea would probably be a bit less since I think some might mistake it with northern japan.



Hence the question about compulsory education.

So the next question is: do a lot of people leave school at 16 and do the extra 2 make any worthy difference to those who stay in school to the age of 18?

And if you don't get geography what do you get, or how does that work?

From what I knew you could more or less pick your own classes but I'm not sure.


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:22:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Also:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4b/World-map-2004-cia-factbook-large-2m.jpg


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:26:30 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>And if you don't get geography what do you get, or how does that work?

The reason why people here know is because school is compulsary to the age of 18 and you get geography from start to finish


 
boondock743 Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:38:48 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>I'm willing to bet *serious* money on it that you can ask 1000 people here (not talking about the foreign people) and not one of them would make that kind of geographical errors...

ill take that bet seriously, and i post the results on the internet, however how much money r we talkin about and how do i know ill get it?


 
JesusOnline Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:42:05 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
In Scotland, you can drop geography after your second year in High School (14 years old normally.)
For the 3rd and 4th years High School education you choose 8 subjects that you'd like to study, and subsequently should you choose to stay on for 5th and 6th year (taking you to 18) you can also choose the subjects you'd like to study then.




 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:52:23 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  boondock743 said:
>ill take that bet seriously, and i post the results on the internet, however how much money r we talkin about and how do i know ill get it?

Well let's say same questions and nobody mistaking france/iran/north korea (as were the questions in the interview) with australia, how about a nice round 100? Nothing over the top and worth betting for.

And since you'll be coming to belgium for it I can give it to you when you're here


 
mat_j Posted: Fri Mar 10 18:59:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm pretty sure... Hell I'm positive that if you did that test in this country you'd have the same hilarious results except they'd probably get a glazed over look in their eyes and be thinking about retaking America. Boy would we love to be in the land of the cheeseburger tree again!

The saddest thing is we now have a way of proving that if you put enough monkeys in a room with enough typewriters you'd get Shakespeare (aka the internet) and all we've come up with is a more efficient way of pssing on messages about who's throwing poo at who and drawings of people wanking.

What i'm trying to say is now we have the ultimate resource at our fingertips for free if needs be and we're still just George Orwells nightmares grinning at the cameras saying "yes Canada, defintily Canada- The South Pole is in Canada."



 
libra Posted: Fri Mar 10 19:11:09 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>>Hence the question about compulsory education.
>
>So the next question is: do a lot of people leave school at 16 and do the extra 2 make any worthy difference to those who stay in school to the age of 18?

most people stay the whole time. And YES those last two years are probably the most important: US history, Government, Econ are all taught during those years.

>And if you don't get geography what do you get, or how does that work?

Geography is covered in elementary school and sometimes in history classes if the teacher wants to.
Geography itself, however, is not an actual course. Not even a semester-long one. I was lucky to have teachers who had us do map-related quizzes and would pull down maps in the classroom to give us an idea of where the things they were talking about were.

>From what I knew you could more or less pick your own classes but I'm not sure.

there are requirements, and there are electives (about 2 electives a year is average.)

It generally works like this:
English (all 4 years)
Science (Biology 1 year, either Chem or Physics another)
Math (I think its a 3 year requirement--but not specific to the type of math, just at whatever level)
History ( 1 yr world history, 1 year US history, 1 semester Govt/ 1 semester Econ)
Physical education (2 years)
Language: 2 years required (most schools only offer spanish and french)
Art: 1 year
Vocational: 1 year (typing, woodshop, autoshop, etc)




 
Mesh Posted: Fri Mar 10 19:27:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>
>
> I was lucky to have teachers who had us do map-related quizzes and would pull down maps in the classroom to give us an idea of where the things they were talking about were.
>


Ahh yeah. I had a couple of pedagogues* who would each day choose a different region/province/nation/whatever and have us draw a detailed map of it, making sure to mark all the rivers and mountain ranges and major cities and the like. That was actually one of my favourite things to do for geography.



*words that are no longer in general usage are fun!


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 10 19:36:13 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:
>It generally works like this:
>...

Mkay. Totally different system


 
libra Posted: Fri Mar 10 19:47:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>libra said:
>>It generally works like this:
>>...
>
>Mkay. Totally different system

A friend of mine had a German exchange student when we were in our third year of high school. It was interesting to talk to her about the differences in our school systems. One of the biggest differences seems to be the way the day is set up, the number of times you go to class every week, and the number of classes taken at once. Here, there are 6 classes throughout the year, generally, and for my school, we went every day, though many schools in the US do 'block' periods where they alternate classes in various ways...

I think that the school system in the US is too lenient. I know people who could take the bare minimum and come out with a very limited scope--not because of a lack of intelligence, but just because they were lazy about school...


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 10 19:59:37 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  libra said:

>A friend of mine had a German exchange student when we were in our third year of high school. It was interesting to talk to her about the differences in our school systems.

I can tell you without a doubt in my mind that the german school system teaches their students WAY more than ours through the elementary and secondary grades. Those kids have their noses to the grindstone.

sheesh, Libra..that photo is so nice


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Mar 10 20:06:07 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  It's old news. It's from 2003. IT'S A JOKE. IT'S SATIRE. THEY PURPOSELY EDITED IT TO MAKE IT FUNNY.

www.cnnn.com- The Australian TV version of the American paper The Onion.

Some Americans are ignorant sometimes, but unless you're American and willing to take a stand on education through action (teaching, lobbying, whatever) there's nothing you can do, so stop caring. Seriously. We'll dig our own ditch, just like every powerful country/empire has done.


 
beetlebum Posted: Fri Mar 10 20:08:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  *www.cnnnn.com

one more "n"



 
Asswipe Posted: Fri Mar 10 20:31:15 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  in high school I studied:

5 years of math(an extra year for calculus)
4 years of history/politics
5 years of science (earth science, biology, chemistry, physics and advanced biology)
3 years of English Literature
4 years of Music
4 years of Physical education
4 years of Spanish Language
1 year of health education
1 year creative writing/composition
1 year sociology
1 year law/legal systems
1 year of art

and some other shit which i can't remember.

the 5 years are from advanced programs that began in 8th grade, or the year before going to high school, when the majority of students studied that work.

at some point or another i've had to know and be able to identify the countries/capitals of most every country in the world as well as all major bodies of water/mountains and other geographical landmarks. Do i remember them now? No. I could tell you the huang tzu river is in china, but I can't differentiate it from the other big one. Shrug. Tigris and Euphrates is where human civilization began which is current day Iraq, or thereabouts.

I posted this mainly for my own amusement in nostaligia. and a tiny bit to show that some of us learned something, even if we tried not to. (I was a piss poor student by comparison to many)

also, Iran is near Iraq, which is near Saudi Arabia. I think the US was stationed in Iran in the first war over in that area, some 15 years ago, to help the Saudi's kick out the Iraqis and Saddam.

In the video, one of the gentleman was looking in the middle east for Iran, but he was fooled by the label "IRAN" big and bold on non-idiot's Australia. for a moment I thought he was going to uncape the caper.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 10 21:13:16 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  We git good skoolin' hear in kaintuky.
Ah gots readin' AND Cipherin'


 
DanSRose Posted: Sat Mar 11 00:49:47 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Again, It was Los Angeles, and the touristy part of LA too.
It is not the brain-center of the USA and the California school system is seriously lacking and lagging, crushing under its own weight.
That said, how can you possibly judge those people in the right when being given a scenario to make policy and they "can't find their ass in the dark," as my old scoutmaster would say. It's a problem when we are hemoraging money for policies (in general) that don't work, aren't working, and those that people are giving the "why is that guy wearing a tin foil hat?" face at.
We're sucking at science, at math, at history, geography, etc etc etc.
But that's all speaking for the masses.

There are some glorious examples at schools giving the bitchslap to policies that are le suck. My public high school in Bayside, Queens, NY routinely got awards for our math and science nerds and we were well feared for our debate teams. Lots of the City's public schools are known for out of the ordinary education tactics and teachers.

To cut education funding, from textbooks to teachers, from free science equipment to free school lunches, from maps to music, is to destroy want and will of the notion that being smart is good. It is killing the inspiration to learn, to rise, to make something of yourself, whether you are the inner city poor or fresh from the farm or shiny in suburbia. And that is a shame that rests with the generation above me, above us, and that we will be paying for.


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Mar 11 02:23:51 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>some delicious margaritas.

But why!
Why do you like them so?

blech



 
boondock743 Posted: Sat Mar 11 03:31:58 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  well u might be jokin but i actualy want to try this survey. it sounds fun.
but i do want take ur bet it doesnt look like ill be going to belgium anytime soon so if ur wrong just mail me... hhmmmm... 20 euros.
thats worth it


 
addi Posted: Sat Mar 11 07:01:05 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sweet P said:
>addi said:
>>some delicious margaritas.
>
>But why!
>Why do you like them so?
>
>blech

Blech? Surely you jest : )

I do love them, god help me. But they must be made with fresh squeezed lime juice, good tequilla, and triple sec or I won't order one. I have ordered them from some bars and after one sip said "blech!" myself.

The small mexican resturant I have visited now for over 10 years has become my "Cheers". A place to forget about the stresses of the week. A place to enjoy a superior margarita, warm tortilla chips, fresh salsa (no cilantro), hot cheese dip, tastey mexican food, and laughter with friends. It's good for my soul...and I need that once a week.

next time you come to Atlanta, P, I will personally take you there, and after trying one you will say "Mmmmmmm...Superb!"

: )


 
Mesh Posted: Sat Mar 11 07:05:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Well good morning


 
addi Posted: Sat Mar 11 08:01:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Gutenmorgen, meshie! wie geht es? schliefen Sie gut?


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Mar 11 10:51:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>Sweet P said:
>>addi said:
>>>some delicious margaritas.
>>
>>But why!
>>Why do you like them so?
>>
>>blech
>
>Blech? Surely you jest : )
>
>I do love them, god help me. But they must be made with fresh squeezed lime juice, good tequilla, and triple sec or I won't order one. I have ordered them from some bars and after one sip said "blech!" myself.
>
>The small mexican resturant I have visited now for over 10 years has become my "Cheers". A place to forget about the stresses of the week. A place to enjoy a superior margarita, warm tortilla chips, fresh salsa (no cilantro), hot cheese dip, tastey mexican food, and laughter with friends. It's good for my soul...and I need that once a week.
>
>next time you come to Atlanta, P, I will personally take you there, and after trying one you will say "Mmmmmmm...Superb!"
>
>: )
Nothing quite like a good margarita or a good bloody mary.


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Mar 11 12:07:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  : P
I don't like.


 
addi Posted: Sat Mar 11 15:26:38 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sweet P said:
>: P
>I don't like.

That's because you haven't had a good one yet : )


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Mar 11 16:59:37 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sweet P said:
>: P
>I don't like.
>
That's OK Darlin, cuz I like you
:-)


 
Mesh Posted: Sat Mar 11 22:02:13 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>Gutenmorgen, meshie! wie geht es? schliefen Sie gut?


Sorry for the long response time lol. I'm good now, a bit of a headache due to slight dehydration. I actually just woke up, when I made my last post I hadn't gone to sleep yet haha. I didn't end up going to sleep until about 2 PM. But then I slept like a baby.




 
Mesh Posted: Tue Mar 14 12:02:07 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  But really, all indications do really seem to point in Irans direction as for which country will get whacked with the stick next. That just seems to be where things are generally headed from what I see and hear in the news everyday.


 
addi Posted: Tue Mar 14 12:52:39 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  meshuggah said:
>But really, all indications do really seem to point in Irans direction as for which country will get whacked with the stick next.

Gawd I hope you're wrong. Someone needs to whach Iran's president up the side of his thick head and knock some sense into the nutcase.
I nominate you, meshie...since you have a middle eastern sounding name and could infiltrate his palace undetected, and they'd be none the wiser.
: )

*personally, I think we need to invade NZ. It could become our 51st state.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Mar 14 13:24:13 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>
>*personally, I think we need to invade NZ. It could become our 51st state.
>
Cool !
Dibs on Choke !


 



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