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CorDrine Posted: Wed Mar 29 10:55:56 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Just wanted to say that I read Dancer's blog, and it really opened up my eye to the world around me.

I really hate my job, and I really hate the long hours I have to put in. But compare to those he describe, I guess I am fortunate.

And I am also guilty of saying how boring Singapore really is, when really, its a lot better in terms of facilities compared to where I came from.

Sometimes you need to see your world with your own eyes to appreciate what you have...


 
Kira Posted: Wed Mar 29 11:27:10 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  You will always have it better than somebody else. It isn't wrong to want something more, nor is it natural to say, "I have enough" and cease all growth, stop looking forward to, and working toward, better things: wealth, leisure and peace. Do you think any one of the children now working in factories, upon getting to where you are today, will say, "now I have everything I ever wanted" and give up?

Be grateful for what you have, but don't feel guilty having it. They wouldn't.


 
FN Posted: Wed Mar 29 11:59:37 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>Be grateful for what you have, but don't feel guilty having it. They wouldn't.

A toast and decadent dinner to that


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Mar 29 17:14:12 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>some deep things


Very much words of wisdom, Kira.


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Mar 29 19:14:39 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>Be grateful for what you have, but don't feel guilty having it. They wouldn't.

I got into a huge fight with my sister over that. In short: I argued with that sentiment (with the footnote that you should help AND enjoy what you got); She was a whiny little 1st year college student who knows tons about Africa and why everything that's done everywhere is bad and we should always feel guilty for it always. She bored me, I went to read the Wigu archives, and she took my car. I wanted to say something about her & wasting oil, but would have meant I would have had to talk to her.
Booo cranky sisters


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Mar 29 19:34:45 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Haven't you heard ?
America is the Great Satan and is responsible for all the bad things on the planet.
We SHOULD fee guilty for creating the world's and most durable economy.


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Mar 29 19:57:33 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Jon Stewart had this guy who wrote this book on last week
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1586483609/sr=8-1/qid=1143679939/ref=sr_1_1/103-5455595-8139817?%5Fencoding=UTF8
The Case For Goliath: How America Acts As The World's Government in the Twenty-first Century by Michael Mandelbaum.

Even though the guy's a dirty liberal, I bet you'd like it hif. I'm pro'ally gonna pick it up this weekend.

From the Washington Post review of it:
" What Mandelbaum's argument comes down to is that the United States provides "public goods" -- security, economic stability, etc. -- to the world in much the same way a government provides these things to its citizens. Which is true, as far it goes. But Mandelbaum contrives to fit U.S. behavior into his "government" paradigm in unconvincing ways. War in Europe, he argues, has come to be considered as undesirable as an infectious disease; therefore, in acting to prevent it, the United States has become a kind of "public health service." That's quite a stretch.

"But the core of Mandelbaum's case -- that U.S. power is so important to the world that the international order would badly fray without it -- is provocative and valuable, given how pervasive the notion has become at home and abroad that the United States is the world's parasite, or predator, or both. Strained analogies aside, Mandelbaum's analysis is generally sure-footed and often original."


 
Posted: Thu Mar 30 00:47:41 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Haven't you heard ?
>America is the Great Satan and is responsible for all the bad things on the planet.
>We SHOULD fee guilty for creating the world's and most durable economy.

Does somebody in Oklahoma deserve it more than somebody in Sierra Leone?


 
Mesh Posted: Thu Mar 30 02:06:32 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>
>Does somebody in Oklahoma deserve it more than somebody in Sierra Leone?


Yes, but the stipulation is that said person must not be Cherokee.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Mar 30 06:51:31 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>Haven't you heard ?
>>America is the Great Satan and is responsible for all the bad things on the planet.
>>We SHOULD fee guilty for creating the world's and most durable economy.
>
>Does somebody in Oklahoma deserve it more than somebody in Sierra Leone?
>
Not necessarily but that's not the point.
If we were to give a substantial amount of our wealth to Sierra Leone, it would change nothing there.
The point is, we shouldn't feel guilty about what we have, for the most part we've earned it.
Why has our economy risen above the rest of the world in just a short hundred years or so ?
There are many other countries with the same amount or more natural resources including population.
I feel very lucky to be where I am and I am proud of my country - no guilt here.


 
addi Posted: Thu Mar 30 07:38:58 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Haven't you heard ?
>America is the Great Satan and is responsible for all the bad things on the planet.

Definately not true. Anyone that feels this way is biased and ignorant of our past.

>We SHOULD fee guilty for creating the world's and most durable economy.

There are many things we should feel guilty (responsible) for as citizens of this country though. Some of our past policies have had a major negative impact on people all over the globe..resulting in depleted natural resources, encouraging a cycle of poverty, deaths of innocent civilians, and support of despotic leaders because it suits our needs at the time.

A deserved pat on the back for the good our nation is responsible for in many places over the past 100 years. But that doesn't give us a free pass to overlook the bad that has sometimes gone along with it.

Keep our historical economic and political foreign policies in perspective please.




 
Posted: Thu Mar 30 09:02:44 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>CriminalSaint said:
>>Does somebody in Oklahoma deserve it more than somebody in Sierra Leone?
>>
>Not necessarily but that's not the point.
>If we were to give a substantial amount of our wealth to Sierra Leone, it would change nothing there.
>The point is, we shouldn't feel guilty about what we have, for the most part we've earned it.

What I meant was mostly in terms of immigration laws.

Look at the sparse population density of some of the american states; just vast distances with too few people living in them.

If America is such a prosperous country that is so certain (and proud) of the strength and future of its economy, and it is so assured in its being a positive force for the world, then why aren't there active measures taken to bring in poorer citizens to improve quality of life overall?

Hundreds of thousands are turned away for citizenship in the united states every year. The green card has become a lottery game.

so, then: why is it that somebody in Oklahoma deserves all these economic benefits and someone in Sierra Leone does not? Why would an immigrent from Sierra Leone possibly be denied citizenship here?

Is it because "for the most part we've earned it"?

Who specifically? Any of us? More than a third-world resident?


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Mar 30 09:23:38 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>CriminalSaint said:
>>>Does somebody in Oklahoma deserve it more than somebody in Sierra Leone?
>>>
>>Not necessarily but that's not the point.
>>If we were to give a substantial amount of our wealth to Sierra Leone, it would change nothing there.
>>The point is, we shouldn't feel guilty about what we have, for the most part we've earned it.
>
>What I meant was mostly in terms of immigration laws.
>
>Look at the sparse population density of some of the american states; just vast distances with too few people living in them.
>
>If America is such a prosperous country that is so certain (and proud) of the strength and future of its economy, and it is so assured in its being a positive force for the world, then why aren't there active measures taken to bring in poorer citizens to improve quality of life overall?
>
>Hundreds of thousands are turned away for citizenship in the united states every year. The green card has become a lottery game.
>
>so, then: why is it that somebody in Oklahoma deserves all these economic benefits and someone in Sierra Leone does not? Why would an immigrent from Sierra Leone possibly be denied citizenship here?
>
>Is it because "for the most part we've earned it"?
>
>Who specifically? Any of us? More than a third-world resident?
>
So, how do you tell the new immigrant that he has to move to the most sparsely populated areas ?
Do you tell them they have to relocate to where there are no jobs ?



 
FN Posted: Thu Mar 30 10:14:15 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>If America is such a prosperous country that is so certain (and proud) of the strength and future of its economy, and it is so assured in its being a positive force for the world, then why aren't there active measures taken to bring in poorer citizens to improve quality of life overall?
>
>Hundreds of thousands are turned away for citizenship in the united states every year. The green card has become a lottery game.

You don't want to go that way, friend.


 
beetlebum Posted: Thu Mar 30 14:32:45 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Jon Stewart had this guy who wrote this book on last week
>http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1586483609/sr=8-1/qid=1143679939/ref=sr_1_1/103-5455595-8139817?%5Fencoding=UTF8
>The Case For Goliath: How America Acts As The World's Government in the Twenty-first Century by Michael Mandelbaum.
>
>Even though the guy's a dirty liberal, I bet you'd like it hif. I'm pro'ally gonna pick it up this weekend.
>
>From the Washington Post review of it:
>" What Mandelbaum's argument comes down to is that the United States provides "public goods" -- security, economic stability, etc. -- to the world in much the same way a government provides these things to its citizens. Which is true, as far it goes. But Mandelbaum contrives to fit U.S. behavior into his "government" paradigm in unconvincing ways. War in Europe, he argues, has come to be considered as undesirable as an infectious disease; therefore, in acting to prevent it, the United States has become a kind of "public health service." That's quite a stretch.
>
>"But the core of Mandelbaum's case -- that U.S. power is so important to the world that the international order would badly fray without it -- is provocative and valuable, given how pervasive the notion has become at home and abroad that the United States is the world's parasite, or predator, or both. Strained analogies aside, Mandelbaum's analysis is generally sure-footed and often original."


Robert Kagan puts forth an extremely similar thesis rather convincingly. ("Of Paradise and Power")


 
FN Posted: Thu Mar 30 17:17:51 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  beetlebum said:
>Robert Kagan puts forth an extremely similar thesis rather convincingly. ("Of Paradise and Power")

The question is though: how long will america be able to put up with it once the world which it thinks to govern over doesn't support it anymore or other police forces (or at least forces who challenge the police) step up to the plate?

Any government falls once it isn't supported anymore, and look at it any way you want: america is losing a lot of its support, and might be straining itself, especially in the long run, with stuff like meddling with the middle east.

Think about russia and china who are always drawing closer together, and think about the us and the eu that are growing apart.

And then you have emerging powers like india to take into account as well. While by themselves they might not matter that much, in a few decades they might be able to tip the balance by choosing sides.




I don't like panicky situations, but I'm telling you that I don't like how the eu and the us are relating to eachother at this point in time while other fronts are (at least starting to) uniting.


 
FN Posted: Thu Mar 30 17:32:41 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BRIC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_power

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potential_Superpowers%E2%80%94India

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potential_Superpowers%E2%80%94China

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potential_Superpowers_-_European_Union


 
FN Posted: Thu Mar 30 18:46:52 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4020973.stm

+ the whole war on terror thing in general

It's stuff like that that has me worried in the face of potential bric alliances withing the next century with a divide between the us and the eu.

The us just does its own thing, which pisses everybody off, I don't think anybody really is denying that, but the pissed off include the eu, which poises the allies against eachother, wether you like it or not.

The eu feels that it is taken for granted by the us and not given the right recognition and respect, and feels like it is actually being deliberately singled out by the us with stuff like dragging the uk into iraq and causing a divide within the eu between core members (not against the uk's own will, ofcourse, so really, don't go apeshit over it because you know what i'm saying, if you don't I'm guessing you have no grasp of how politics are percieved by a public and there's no point for you in reading any further).

The us seems to think that it can do whatever it wants and that the eu will automaticly agree, without taking into account the effects stuff like that has on the mind of the eu population and in the long term translates into elected officials.

While on the other hand us sentiment is that the eu owes the us, and that the eu not agreeing to the us's every whim is treason, just like how anybody who goes against what bush says is shot down by the other half of america, it seems to be no different in international matters.

I seriously think (and <*honestly*> fear) a lot of americans are underestimating the damage that is being done and the bridges that are being blown up.

All of it spurs euro-nationalism in a way that most europeans even don't consciously notice, but I assure you; it's there and it's growing, but the manner in which it is growing (feeling like they don't want to take it anymore that the us thinks it can dictate the eu, and that the us tries to rattle the cage) doesn't seem healthy to me.

http://www.oxfordpress.com/hp/content/shared/news/world/stories/05/08_EUROPE_SUPERPOWER.html

The eu from its own side seems to be making a similar mistake in terms of seeming to be in the process of trying to cut through as many bonds as possible with the us, with a growing rivalry, only enlarging the gap and with the possibility of losing sight of the major problems the eu faces like demographic and economic problems as well as true political unification.

By doing so the eu is shooting itself in the foot more than once in the process of letting things go to its head prematurely, because most europeans are very aware of things like this:

http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=4366

But that doesn't mean everything is destined to go well; having the potential doesn't guarantee a good outcome at all.



Something that really captures the troubles between the eu and the us if you have 5 minutes of spare time:
http://www.aei.org/research/nai/publications/pubID.16989,projectID.11/pub_detail.asp






Meanwhile, russia and china are keeping quiet and becoming friends while not pissing too many people off in the rest of the world, and india goes virtually unnoticed.





I think this calls for caution, at least.


 
FN Posted: Thu Mar 30 18:52:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>I think this calls for caution, at least.

But then again, because I can hear the responses coming already: a lot of people will think I'm glorifying the eu here or bashing the us, while I don't think I really did either.


But I'm just a naieve 19 year old, what do I know about politics, right?


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 31 07:18:42 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>But I'm just a naieve 19 year old, what do I know about politics, right?

A hell of a lot! You're my political mentor!
: )

Any half-wit student of history knows that every great power goes by the wayside sooner or later. The U.S. will be no exception. The question then becomes not if, but when, concerning our role as superpower in the global community. Will we become a "has been" 10 years from now, or 500 years from now?

My personal belief is that the Bush administration has significantly hastened the downfall of America's global supremacy. Whether we've gone past the point of no return, or whether a future administration can get us back on the right track remains to be seen.

I'll leave questions like that for future historians to ponder...and brilliant 19 year old Belgians.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 31 07:53:45 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  And I think that history will show Dubya to be one of our greatest presidents.
So there !
:-)


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 31 08:17:48 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>and brilliant 19 year old Belgians.

You forgot horny


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 31 08:38:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>And I think that history will show Dubya to be one of our greatest presidents.
>So there !
>:-)

I sincerely hope you're right, hif. I don't think he will be, but this is a case where I'd gladly be incorrect.


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 31 08:38:58 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>You forgot horny

sorry....

horny


 
maybeitwillwork Posted: Fri Mar 31 09:56:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  So the conclusion here is:
1.life is depressing, and unfair but lets not feel bad about that
2. no one is special
3. the US sucks
4.19 year old horny Belgians are always right
5. so lets all move to Belgian


 
DanSRose Posted: Fri Mar 31 10:10:25 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  6. If you move to Belgium, you will learn geo-politcs and become instantly horny.

I think I may want to move to Belgium


 
addi Posted: Fri Mar 31 10:16:25 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  maybeitwillwork said:

>5. so lets all move to Belgian

sadly...they don't want us. I tried last year. They had a "No Vacancy, Especially for Americans" sign at the border


 
FN Posted: Fri Mar 31 10:36:29 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I don't mind amaericans, as long as they're caucasian.


 
DanSRose Posted: Fri Mar 31 16:26:41 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe, between your post and your new avatar, I am not sure if you are joking.
But then again I just had my wisdom tooth removed and that means I've done lost all my smarts. (get it? 'wisdom'? I'm in pain)


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 31 16:44:27 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Christophe, between your post and your new avatar, I am not sure if you are joking.
>But then again I just had my wisdom tooth removed and that means I've done lost all my smarts. (get it? 'wisdom'? I'm in pain)
>
May I suggest two vicodins and two tylenol 3's, chased down with 8 ounces of Maker's Mark.
Too bad they don't make Qualuudes anymore. . . .


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Mar 31 19:42:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>
>Too bad they don't make Qualuudes anymore. . . .


You've just gotta know where to look.




But you didn't hear that from me.


 
DanSRose Posted: Fri Mar 31 21:26:21 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  They gave me an antibiotic and Tylenol with codeine. It was getting to the "annoying pain" level, so at about 4:45 I said, "What the hey?"
Then it was 7:10 and I have been about 10 seconds behind for the entirety of the evening.

This is why don't like taking drugs like these. It makes the world less. I'd rather feel the pain


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Mar 31 21:56:05 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>They gave me an antibiotic and Tylenol with codeine. It was getting to the "annoying pain" level, so at about 4:45 I said, "What the hey?"
>Then it was 7:10 and I have been about 10 seconds behind for the entirety of the evening.
>
>This is why don't like taking drugs like these. It makes the world less. I'd rather feel the pain
>
I don't take them recreationally anymore, but If I need a painkiller, I will indulge myself.
I had not problems taking the vicodin when I rolled my ankle in January and no problems taking the percocets when my sciatical flared up last month.
Actually I can't take them recreationally anymore even if I wanted to, because I no longer like the way they make me feel.
But if I have sever pain, I like the way they let me sleep through it. The only real drawback there is they make me really grumpy.


 
maybeitwillwork Posted: Fri Mar 31 22:24:05 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:

>But if I have sever pain, I like the way they let me sleep through it. The only real drawback there is they make me really grumpy.

You don't think that sleeping through the whole day is a problem?

It's the only reason I don't like taking them. The whole day goes to waste and nothing gets done.


 
misszero Posted: Sat Apr 1 02:05:59 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  speaking of sierra leone and immigration, just a little shout out to any of the guys who ditched the commonwealth games to live in Oz. They got the biggest cheer at the closing ceremony because of the whole running away thing, us aussies love an underdog/fugitive.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Apr 1 07:01:47 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  maybeitwillwork said:
>ifihadahif said:
>
>>But if I have sever pain, I like the way they let me sleep through it. The only real drawback there is they make me really grumpy.
>
>You don't think that sleeping through the whole day is a problem?
>
>It's the only reason I don't like taking them. The whole day goes to waste and nothing gets done.
>
Believe me, if you were experiencing the kind of pain I had, you would love to be able to sleep through it.
As it was, I couldn't walk anyway, so nothing was going to get done either way, with or without the painkillers.


 
FN Posted: Sat Apr 1 07:27:21 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Christophe, between your post and your new avatar, I am not sure if you are joking.

Maybe I am, maybe I'm not. Who's to say.


 
addi Posted: Sat Apr 1 07:43:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:


>Maybe I am, maybe I'm not. Who's to say.

I'll say, Dammit...and you'll agree with me too!


so what do you want me to say?


 
DanSRose Posted: Sat Apr 1 13:03:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hey! Where'd all the avatars go?


 
maybeitwillwork Posted: Sat Apr 1 13:34:21 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:

>Believe me, if you were experiencing the kind of pain I had, you would love to be able to sleep through it.
>As it was, I couldn't walk anyway, so nothing was going to get done either way, with or without the painkillers.

I can't say that i know what kind of pain you have, or how bad it is. But I know that I've experienced pain where doing anything became impossible.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Apr 1 13:44:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  pain is bad



 
maybeitwillwork Posted: Sat Apr 1 14:33:26 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>pain is bad


Yes it is.


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Apr 5 00:41:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Hey! Where'd all the avatars go?

I blame that on the pain.
Still, I recently updated Firefox from 1.0.5 to 1.5.0 and now all the gifs and avatars that used to animated aren't that disturbs and vexes me. What should I kick to make it work the way I want it to work?

Next time anyone's in NY, you should go to either Tea and Sympathy or A-salt and Battery (their owned by the same blokes and right next door to each other). They serve and sell British food, items, and cuisine, and what I mean by that the owners got homesick, opened their own restaurants, have only British/Scottish/Welsh servers and cooks and sell things you can't get in America like awesome super British chocolate (like HobNobs) and HP sauce. The chips from smaller, cheaper, quicker restaurant, A-salt and Battery, were OutStanding.


 
addi Posted: Wed Apr 5 07:27:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:

>They serve and sell British food, items, and cuisine, and what I mean by that the owners got homesick, opened their own restaurants, have only British/Scottish/Welsh servers and cooks and sell things you can't get in America like awesome super British chocolate (like HobNobs) and HP sauce.

Dan...Dan...Dan...
I think you need a visit to the Doc to get your taste buds tested. The words "good food" and "England" should never be in the same sentence. The English produce some outstanding movies, TV, beer, and music, but their food preparation skills suck.
They have a special talent of taking a perfectly good food item and turning it into crap.

: )

Steak and Kidney pie anyone?


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Apr 5 07:35:12 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  How about a nice cow placenta? I could throw on some onions.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Apr 5 07:48:31 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>DanSRose said:
>
>>They serve and sell British food, items, and cuisine, and what I mean by that the owners got homesick, opened their own restaurants, have only British/Scottish/Welsh servers and cooks and sell things you can't get in America like awesome super British chocolate (like HobNobs) and HP sauce.
>
>Dan...Dan...Dan...
>I think you need a visit to the Doc to get your taste buds tested. The words "good food" and "England" should never be in the same sentence. The English produce some outstanding movies, TV, beer, and music, but their food preparation skills suck.
>They have a special talent of taking a perfectly good food item and turning it into crap.
>
>: )
>
>Steak and Kidney pie anyone?
>
For the most part I am in agreement with you on this one Addi, but you must admit they perfected fish and chips.
Also, have you ever had yorkshire pudding ? Yummy !


 
addi Posted: Wed Apr 5 07:54:53 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:

>For the most part I am in agreement with you on this one Addi, but you must admit they perfected fish and chips.
>Also, have you ever had yorkshire pudding ? Yummy !

Yeah..you're right. As I was writing it I kept thinking about a few things I did like...but I didn't want to start listing exceptions : )

Yorkshire pudding is delicious..and some of the stuff they serve at tea (scones and biscuits) are good too. I must take exception on the fish and chips though. The few times I tried it it was wrapped in newsprint (literally) and I could watch the grease drip out of the bottom of it. Yuck.


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Apr 5 09:24:55 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Lunch Menu
http://www.teaandsympathynewyork.com/rest_menu_lunch.php

Dinner Menu
http://www.teaandsympathynewyork.com/rest_menu_dinner.php

It's a Flash site, you have to find the menu yourself
http://www.asaltandbattery.com/indexb.html

But really, the chips were awesome.
When I said that British food was in general awesome, I had an Aero bar hanging out of my mouth. I ate two last night and I'm staring down the third. I bought my friend a bottle of HP Sauce and a jar of HobNobs.

Now someone help me with Firefox. I need to see moving pictures.



 
FN Posted: Wed Apr 5 09:42:39 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://www.belgianfries.com/


 
FN Posted: Wed Apr 5 09:45:23 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Why are they called "French Fries"?

Explanation 1: the French invented fries, that's why we call them French Fries. Wrong, as we have seen above.

Explanation 2: during the first World War, American soldiers came to our country and discovered our fries. As the inhabitants spoke French (the biggest battles were fought in Ieper near the French border), the soldiers called them French Fries. Wrong again.

In fact, the explanation is quite simple: in English, 'to french' means (or at least meant) 'to cut into lengthwise pieces'. You probably know 'frenched beans'. So logically, French Fries is short for 'frenched and fried potatoes'. In fact, the English call them 'chips', a word which has a similar meaning (a chipped piece of wood).





I just thought I'd throw that in again for all the freedom fries lovers out there


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Apr 5 09:49:17 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm enjoying my apple Roses of the Prophet Muhammad, or Apple Muhammadan for short.


 
DanSRose Posted: Wed Apr 5 09:55:38 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  No one calls them 'freedom fries'. They quickly were left to the fodder of late night TV, then forgotten, because it was such a retarded issue. Anyone who calls them freedom fries are devoid of reasoning and no one acknowledges those people in either public or private.

Anyway you cut them, they are the most awesome thing to eat. mmmmmm


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Apr 5 10:12:58 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>In fact, the explanation is quite simple: in English, 'to french' means (or at least meant) 'to cut into lengthwise pieces'. You probably know 'frenched beans'. So logically, French Fries is short for 'frenched and fried potatoes'. In fact, the English call them 'chips', a word which has a similar meaning (a chipped piece of wood).
>
I've never heard of frenched beans.
But to cut in lengthwise pieces sounds a lot like "to julienne".

In any case, pretty much any way you fry a potato, it has to be good.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Apr 5 10:16:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>ifihadahif said:
>
>>For the most part I am in agreement with you on this one Addi, but you must admit they perfected fish and chips.
>>Also, have you ever had yorkshire pudding ? Yummy !
>
>Yeah..you're right. As I was writing it I kept thinking about a few things I did like...but I didn't want to start listing exceptions : )
>
>Yorkshire pudding is delicious..and some of the stuff they serve at tea (scones and biscuits) are good too. I must take exception on the fish and chips though. The few times I tried it it was wrapped in newsprint (literally) and I could watch the grease drip out of the bottom of it. Yuck.
>
On the other hand, "The Great Chefs of the UK" is a very thin book I'm sure.


 
choke Posted: Wed Apr 5 14:28:08 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
I must take exception on the fish and chips though. The few times I tried it it was wrapped in newsprint (literally) and I could watch the grease drip out of the bottom of it. Yuck.

WAHAHAHAH! You snob. I never even realized that the rest of the world didn't wrap their chips in newspaper til I read this. Fish and chips are so normal... And you don't have pies here either :(




 
addi Posted: Wed Apr 5 14:51:43 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:

>WAHAHAHAH! You snob. I never even realized that the rest of the world didn't wrap their chips in newspaper til I read this. Fish and chips are so normal... And you don't have pies here either :(

Snobery has nothing to do with it, you lil' whippersnapper! It's called having taste.

: )


And we most certainly do have pies here..proper pies with fruit filling.
*except for chicken pot pies..they would taste crappy with fruit in them.


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Apr 5 14:53:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>
>And we most certainly do have pies here..proper pies with fruit filling.
>*except for chicken pot pies..they would taste crappy with fruit in them.


Nay Good Sir, I take it you have never tried mango and banana with your chicken pot pie?


 
choke Posted: Wed Apr 5 14:54:57 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>choke said:
>
>>WAHAHAHAH! You snob. I never even realized that the rest of the world didn't wrap their chips in newspaper til I read this. Fish and chips are so normal... And you don't have pies here either :(
>
>Snobery has nothing to do with it, you lil' whippersnapper! It's called having taste.
>
>: )
>
You think eating out of a newspaper is bad taste?! :O

>
>And we most certainly do have pies here..proper pies with fruit filling.
>*except for chicken pot pies..they would taste crappy with fruit in them.

Ick. Where's your mince and cheese? Your potato?! You're all going to get deficiencies. Where's your manly steak and kidney?!?!!




 
Mesh Posted: Wed Apr 5 14:59:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
>
>You think eating out of a newspaper is bad taste?! :O
>



Not bad taste. Just taste bad.


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Apr 5 15:02:14 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
> Where's your manly kidney?!?!!
>
>



My left kidney hurts right at the moment. I'm not sure how manly that makes it.


 
addi Posted: Wed Apr 5 15:30:54 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Mr. Misses said:

>My left kidney hurts right at the moment.

That's what happens to people that eat grease soaked fish and chips from newsprint...
really...
it's a scientific fact.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Apr 5 15:51:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
>addi said:
>Ick. Where's your mince and cheese? Your potato?! You're all going to get deficiencies. Where's your manly steak and kidney?!?!!
>
Most Americans don't eat organs, there are some that do, but most don't.
The most common are liver and onions and fried chicken gizzards or livers.



 



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