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Sex Ed
libra Posted: Thu Apr 6 23:27:01 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hey kids.

K, so I'm doing a paper for my Controlling Processes class (so fun) on the controlling processes of the American Sex Education system (you know, don't have sex cause bad things will happen but we won't tell you those things because keeping you ignorant seems like a better option).

Well, anyway, I'd like to do a bit of a comparison to other countries sex ed system (mainly public schools). So it would be wonderful if some of you from other places would give me a general idea of what it's like so that perhaps I can be a bit more focused when I do research for that section. (i.e. what you learn about contraception, STDs, sexuality, etc)

And those of you who are from the US, if you have anything you experienced that seems particularly important, that'd be great to hear as well!


 
*m*a*s* Posted: Fri Apr 7 00:02:34 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm from Canada. When I was in school they started basic sex education in health class in elementary school (proper names for body parts, stuff like that), but left the actual "where do babies come from" to the parents. Once we hit 9th grade (in my school anyway), there was a mandatory sex education course where we learned about the biological aspects of sex, and pregnancy and STIs. There was also a box at the front of the classroom that students could anonymously put questions that the teacher *had* to answer (everything under the sun... I think one person asked what the best sexual position was, and got an answer). In high school there's also a family living type course that goes over pregnancy and safe sex. All of the classes stressed the importance of abstinence without ignoring the fact that most kids in high school are having sex.

Oh, and my when my little sister went through it all 5 years later, they handed out condoms to the whole class more than once. And I know the public health nurse brings condoms with her to hand out whenever she visits the schools.

And there was a new guide made avaible to junior high/high school kids a few years ago that goes over all aspects of sexuality (from foreplay to protection to homosexual sex to STIs to... well, everything). I think the book may have been banned in the classroom, but at I know of a lot nurses and women's centers that hand it out to whoever wants it (parents and kids alike).

Hope this helps!


 
Mark Posted: Fri Apr 7 05:56:30 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  (My apologies if I use the wrong names for your school systemÖ I hope you can guess what I mean by the ages mentioned along with it)

Sex education in the Netherlands

Itís been al while since I had sex education, but it is still done in a similar way. When I was about 11 years old (1994) they gave sex education at school. It was mandatory, unless your parents said otherwise. It handled about everything. What happens in puberty (including pimples), wet dreams, masturbation, sex, pregnancy, contraception, homosexuality (and why it isnít a disease or something like that). About the age of 13 or 14 Iíve got some extra information during biology class in (junior?) high school. Subjects like erogenous zones where handled. At the age of 16 I took biology class as on of the subject to graduate from high school. It also handles reproduction, animals, plants and humans alike. Thatís about itÖ or at least what I can remember ;)

There are at least two differences these days. There is an experiment going on with giving kids (about 4 years old) some sex education. It doesnít go any further than telling the difference between boys and girls and a bit about kissing. The kissing part is about the type of kisses there are e.g.: Friendship, greeting and love Öand not about something like the French Kiss.

The other thing that differs is that, mostly in the bigger cities (and we donít have many of those :p ) children (age 10-12) are told that group rape isnít a good way to behave. The last two years there have been many. Most of the time it was a group of about 15 boys (copycats) in the age of 10-18 raping one or more girls. They hope to reduce this kind of activities this way.

Good luck with your paper :)


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 7 07:47:21 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Being a product of the U.S. public school system, and having it be so long ago, I don't think I can add any insights here, Libra.

But you did remind me about how I first learned about sex.

I was walking with my neighbor, LeRoy Wagner, to the local Ben Franklin five and dime store when I was in 3rd grade. He was a few years older than me, and as it turned out, wiser in the ways of the flesh. For some reason the conversation turned to babies and he asked me if I knew where they came from. I remember having to stop and think about it and then told him they came "from the hospital". He laughed at me and proceeded to explain in detail about what my mom and dad did to "make" me. I remember thinking he was crazy, and being totally grossed out at the thought of it.
When we did get around to sex ed in 6th grade biology class (had to have signed permission slips from our parents to participate) it was all explained to me in cold clinical detail.
I discovered LeRoy was right all along.


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 7 07:50:09 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Wolffie said:
>children (age 10-12) are told that group rape isnít a good way to behave. The last two years there have been many.

Ik kijk meestal naar Netwerk op ned1, is daar ook al enkele keren ter sprake gekomen. Viel mij op hoe veel vreemdelingen er in Nederland zitten en wa voor excessen qua seksuele moraal er uit die mannekes hunnen bek druipt. Is't "in't echt" ook zo erg, of zijn die reportages gewoon sensatie? En ook, die groepsverkrachtingen, zijn da meestal allochtonen of veel autochtonen ook?

Heb overlaatst een reportage gezien over hoe veel meiskes er voor bv gsmkaarten zitten te pijpen of voor webcams zitten strippen enz, is da echt zo wijdverspreid in Nederland als die reportages doen uitschijnen?





Sex eductation in Belgium

Most kids know most stuff there is to know from tv or from their parents usually, even before they get hit with it at school. My parents were always very open about it, and when I joke around with my mother a lot of the time it's about sexually oriented jokes as well even today.

The first time we got some sort of sex education at school was at a rather early age (I'm talking 8-10 years old), in the form of telling children the basic differences between men and women with the help of the teacher and some books made for that exact purpose for kids. It wasn't very extensive at the time, just the mere basics for a few days.

Later, around the age of 12 and 14, you get more elaborate information on special days devoted to sex education, in which it is mainly explained what kind of dangers one might encounter in the form of STD's and such, and how to prevent them, as well as proper use of anticonception. Both males and females get the same course in temrs of anticonception, but at some point during the sex ed class the groups were split into boys/girls with seperate educators for a while as to give both groups the chance to talk freely about any questions they might have without being afraid to ask them in front of the opposite sex (12 year olds, whattayagonnado). I percieved that to be a very good way of bringing things across. Everything was just called by its name, a vagina was a vagina, a penis a penis, plain and simple, without looking for a way to avoid "dirty words".

The atmosphere that they tried to create (and managed to create if you ask me) was also one of openness and maturity basicly, and I think they did that by just telling it straight to the kids and starting off by "you can laugh if you want, there's nothing wrong with that, just keep in mind that this is something you ought to be aware of".

I don't remember any of the kids giggling out of discomfort during the classes, even with some explicit pictures if you will. That's the way to go I think if you want stuff to be taken seriously.

From age 12-18 you get biology in school, with a lot of focus on anatomy of the human body. You basicly saw just about everything that has to do with conception, I'm guessing, as well as anticonception. It was a kind of re-occuring sex ed throughout the school carreer if you want to see it that way.

You got extensive classes on how both reproductive organs work, down to how hormone levels change during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy and what not.

In religious classes we dealt with the emotional sides of sex and relationships, I can only talk from my own experiences here, but it was always dealt with in a mature way, by teacher and students alike, and even though our teacher was a devout catholic there was no problem whatsoever to speak your mind, and she talked in clear terms as well.

Throughout our high school carreer we also got a visit about once a year from, for example, a person with AIDS, to explain the dangers of it and what not.


So basicly, to make a long story short, I'm very happy with the way it was dealt with in my younger years. I think I can safely say that I personally, and most people I know, can openly talk about sex without needless shame or anything like it, which is also healthy for a love-relationship if you can be clear about sex.

The key, to me, was the abundance of clear and correct information, without the use of scare tactics. Just tell it like it is, I say.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Apr 7 08:02:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
 
>Wolffie said:
>>children (age 10-12) are told that group rape isnít a good way to behave. The last two years there have been many.
>
>


Must be all the levantians.




I was basically given the straight facts. What was where and what it did. The mechanics of it, if you will. All of that from Biology classes.

I had an ethics class that briefly covered sex from that standpoint. Like two days pretty much is what we spent on it.


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Apr 7 08:10:43 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh, and in the preteen years, we had several assembly type deals where they gathered all students in the same age group and we had group discussions about pretty much anything to do with sex that you could think of. We could ask pretty much any question we had about sex and they were required to answer the best they could.

Topics of discussion included STDs, contraceptives, sexual preferences, first times, relationships with your partners, etc.


And then we were shown videos. You know the kind, I'm sure.


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 7 08:34:10 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I think European countries in general deal with this topic in a healthier way than we do. I also know things have changed a lot here since I was in school. There was a stigma about sex being naughty, evil, bad, whatever, back in my schooldays...especially in the bible-belt midwest. They covered a few of the general basics in sex ed., but we were on our own as far as having any clue about technique, or what to expect when the time came to explore another person's body. It was all trial and error.
I had my first real experience with a girl's "nether-regions" when I was 16, it was a total shocker to me. No one ever told me what to expect and what biological reactions were normal. I was on a blind date with a cheerleader from another high school with my bud and his girlfriend and we went to a drive-in movie...and of course didn't watch a second of the movie. So I was in the back seat with her and we're smooching and I'm feeling her chest (all stuff I'd done before), but as the evening progressed I got daring and let my hand explore under her jeans...a first for me. I still have a very vivid memory of moving my hand down "there" and discovering she was wet. I remember immediately pulling my hand out and thinking to myself, "Oh my God! What was that and have I done?!!"
I stuck to kissing the rest of the night. Proper sex ed. classes would have prepared me in advance for that close encounter.




 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 7 09:05:42 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>I remember immediately pulling my hand out and thinking to myself, "Oh my God! What was that and have I done?!!"

You go, tiger.


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 7 09:16:50 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>You go, tiger.

If only I'd had you in the front seat to coach me through, Chris...if only

: )



 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Apr 7 10:10:28 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sex is bad !
This thread is bad !
You will all burn in hell !

Who wants their toenails painted ?


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 7 11:27:32 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>If only I'd had you in the front seat to coach me through, Chris...if only

If it makes you feel any better: the first time I fingered a girl she didn't get an orgasm either due to cramps in my wrist.

All time low point of my confidence; I can still feel the deep shame burning in my soul.

I rectified the situation half an hour later though, with some guidelines from her side after having asked her what would do the trick (made the rookie mistake on focusing too much on vaginal instead of clitoral stimulation, oh the humanity), but still, I know, sort of, how this must have affected your life.


 
Mark Posted: Fri Apr 7 11:45:52 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>Wolffie said:
>>children (age 10-12) are told that group rape isnít a good way to behave. The last two years there have been many.
>
>Ik kijk meestal naar Netwerk op ned1, is daar ook al enkele keren ter sprake gekomen. Viel mij op hoe veel vreemdelingen er in Nederland zitten en wa voor excessen qua seksuele moraal er uit die mannekes hunnen bek druipt. Is't "in't echt" ook zo erg, of zijn die reportages gewoon sensatie? En ook, die groepsverkrachtingen, zijn da meestal allochtonen of veel autochtonen ook?
>
>Heb overlaatst een reportage gezien over hoe veel meiskes er voor bv gsmkaarten zitten te pijpen of voor webcams zitten strippen enz, is da echt zo wijdverspreid in Nederland als die reportages doen uitschijnen?
>

Ik denk dat het bij de meeste gewoon beetje patserij is. De reportages laten veelal wel het meest extreme zien. Niet iedereen is zo erg, al zitten ze er dus wel tussen. Jammer is wel dat veel volgen. De groepsverkrachtingen zijn zowel allochtonen als autochtonen... in de grote steden. No offence, maar de autochtonen die het doen zijn meestal van die nep gangsta rappertjes.

Die meisjes die overal voor pijpen kom je overal tegen. In de grote steden naar verhouding meer, maar ook op het platte land. Er woont er bij mij een om de hoek (geen grap).


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 7 11:48:41 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Der is toch geen ene gast die die meiskes nog wilt nadien?




sex ed:

http://www.virob.com/virob/flash/165.html


 
Mesh Posted: Fri Apr 7 11:51:42 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Foorwijf


That is all.


 
addi Posted: Fri Apr 7 12:38:10 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  sorry, Libra..we seemed to have gotten slightly off topic here.

I blame Christophe myself.


 
jennemmer Posted: Fri Apr 7 12:48:17 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  We had various levels of sex ed

In grade 3 and 4 we had a unit about 'good and bad sorts of touches'. It dealt with the fact that girls and boys had different private parts and taught that private parts were the parts that got covered by underwear. They didn't talk about what was underneath. The main message was that somebody touching your private parts was bad and not a secret you should keep. It also had a really annoyingly catchy theme song that I still remember because we had to listen to it daily for the length of the unit in both years. It went "my body's nobody's body but mine. You have your own body let me have mine".

Grade 5 was official sex ed of the "you are hitting puberty here is what you need to know variety". It was more about how the body changed than why. Sex was only mentioned as far as it was what caused babies and could give you certain diseases.

It didn't get mentioned at school again until grade 9 when we were studying body systems and reproduction was one of them. We learned about the mechanics of fertilization and got shown a video of a birth in all of it's gory detail. We had a unit on AIDS and one afternoon class was spent practicing putting condoms on bananas. Our teacher made the mistake of buying a lubricated variety and it added to the class's general discomfort with having to practice with the condoms in groups of 4 because there weren't enough bananas. Some kid had the brilliant idea to slingshot a lubricated condom at the back of one girls head and the whole thing disintigrated from there.

In essence the whole school experience was pretty poorly handled. Thank goodness for alternative sources of information.


 
libra Posted: Fri Apr 7 12:55:34 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Thank you all so much! It will definitely point me in the right direction for comparisons.


 
choke Posted: Fri Apr 7 14:27:22 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  It was pretty much taken as a given that we would know where babies came from by the time we hit 11-12 years of age (I remember my mother left a "Where did I come from?" book on my bed and I reread it, twice. Just to make sure I wasn't missing anything.

We learnt about puberty in Intermediate, Forms 1 & 2, ages 11-13, roughly. We had videos and diagrams etc.

Then every year after that, we have a unit in our P.E class for a few weeks where people show us pictures of genital warts and tell us horror stories about STDs. We also learn about drinking and drugs in those classes too. We watch videos and work in groups to think of "good decisions" etc. We make a lot of posters.

We have a Wellbeing House right opposite our school where you go for free condoms, STD checks, birth control pills, morning after pills, counselling, addiction groups, all that kindof stuff. We can get passes from our school and just run over in our lunchbreak. It's pretty sweet.


 
Silentmind Posted: Sat Apr 8 02:42:11 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Perhaps not too much to add, but here it goes. In my part of Canada, the proper body parts comes in elementary school. The more detailed, here is where babies come from/this is how to practice safe sex comes in junior high. In High School there is a mandatory class called CALM, Career and Life Management, which has a component sex ed section. It deals with STDs, Safe Sex, and all that. Hope your paper goes well Libra


 
Ed Posted: Sat Apr 8 10:45:50 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sex Ed






heh heh heh









do it


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Apr 8 10:50:32 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I think he's talking to you Cherry
:-)


 
Mesh Posted: Sat Apr 8 10:52:21 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:
>Sex Ed
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Hehehe, I thought of that as well.


*dims lights*


 
Mouse Posted: Sat Apr 8 11:36:04 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:
>Sex Ed
>
>heh heh heh

I saw that coming from so far away I felt like I was on top of Everest.


 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Sat Apr 8 11:46:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>I think he's talking to you Cherry

*blushes*
*hides*

damnit puck not here.....




 
Ed Posted: Sat Apr 8 11:57:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  hlmfaowroflafdts

There was NO way I could ignore that opportunity! NO way.

I'm so glad I didn't settle with the "Aw, I thought this thread was about me. *pouts*" post.


 
Ed Posted: Sat Apr 8 12:06:40 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Cherry_Moon said:
>*blushes*
>*hides*
>
>damnit puck not here.....

(insert Dr. Seuss parody here)

o, the things you let me get away with...


 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Sat Apr 8 14:45:17 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:
>Cherry_Moon said:
>>*blushes*
>>*hides*
>>
>>damnit puck not here.....
>
>(insert Dr. Seuss parody here)
>
>o, the things you let me get away with...

Do i have to threaten you with bodily harm boy?

Our Dr. Seuss parodies are for us only.... *grumbles*

btw- everybody on gt- i don't know him....


 
Mesh Posted: Sat Apr 8 15:04:50 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I remember when me and Ed were pretty good buddies back in 'Nam. We kind of drifted apart once we came back to the world.


I feel like I don't know you anymore, Ed. We said we'd keep in touch.


That's what we all said.....


 
Ed Posted: Sat Apr 8 16:00:14 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  it's just what the mil' does; it takes lives. it took our lives, gave us another one, we took lives, then it took ours again


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Apr 8 16:35:38 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I might be a little late for this but I will tell you how it went down in my area of Canada incase you still want to know:

In grade 4 we had our introduction to sex ed. Like others have said, we learnt the names of our body parts. At my school we also learnt the functions of these parts and learnt a bit about the insides too [general reproductive system] but not in too much detail. The teacher concentrated more on the changes we would go through rather than baby formation. To explain the menstrual cycle she first had to teach us what a uterus was, etc.

[My favourite part about sex ed that year was when she was talking about menstruation and how people call it a "period" and then my friend Shaun ran over to the garbage can and threw up infront of the whole class haha]

We had a recap in grade 5 too.

Then in grade 7 we went through the whole thing again and this time went into more detail about the rest of the reproductive system and how babies come to be. Boys were less shy and started asking questions like "Do girls get their period forever- like, does it never stop, ever?" haha and girls learnt about the doom they would face if they ever wanted to have children. We were taught about condoms and a couple of STD's but we didn't go into depth there yet.

In grade 9 gym/health we went into way more detail about everything. We had a lot of tests - one on the female reproductive system, another on the male, one on STD's. We had a few videos - mostly births and c sections [fuck!] What I found interesting was that because every student had to take this course in grade nine and the classes were big, they divided the boys into one class and girls in the other. I think they thought this would give us the opportunity to ask questions openly about one another without feeling too awkward. Also, not every elementary school taught the same and some of the students weren't as knowledgable about the other sex.




 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Sun Apr 9 03:22:27 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:
>it's just what the mil' does; it takes lives. it took our lives, gave us another one, we took lives, then it took ours again

lmao.... my dear sweet dork.

*pats head*


 
Ed Posted: Sun Apr 9 12:30:07 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Cherry_Moon said:
>lmao.... my dear sweet dork.

HEY! .....Mesh started it....

Anyway, that was just what I thought about Jarhead.


 
Ed Posted: Sun May 28 00:58:49 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  seriously, do it.


 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Sun May 28 02:57:10 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ed said:
>seriously, do it.

where? when? who?


 
misszero Posted: Sun May 28 09:11:03 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
> anticonception

sweet p said:
> baby formation, stuff about throwing up

ahahahha. this thread really tickled my funny bone.

when i first read about sex in a book, i was 8, and it talked about the guy discharging, so i drew the most logical conclusion and thought that the boy peed inside the girl. I was thoroughly grossed out.




 
misszero Posted: Mon May 29 08:02:25 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i was going to ask why i seem to kill threads dead.

but then i re-read my last post in this one. I guess that's why....


 
Mesh Posted: Mon May 29 11:25:02 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  misszero said:
>i was going to ask why i seem to kill threads dead.
>



Awww. Don't worry about it. That happens to me ALL the time.


 
Ed Posted: Mon May 29 20:32:20 2006 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The thread was already dead.


 



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