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Forbidden anti-islamisation protest and consequences
FN Posted: Tue Sep 11 19:10:02 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The story:

A side note to keep in mind to put the following into perspective: Vlaams Belang is a Flemish (the Dutch/Flemish speaking part of Belgium) nationalistic party (right wing), which wants Flanders to seperate from Wallonia (the 2 halves that constitue Belgium). The Parti Socialiste is a socialist (left wing) Wallonian (the French speaking part of the country) party, which fears the split of the country because of the billions in financial aid that go from Flanders to Wallonia on a yearly basis to pay for the Wallonian unemployment allocations.

Also worth mentioning is that the major gets a lot of his votes from non-Belgian immigrants, who are allowed to vote in the regional elections (fucked up, I know). And guess who immigrants vote for. Socialists, ofcourse.


Now, here comes the tricky part:

On 9 september 2007 there was a legitimate left wing portest march in Brussels with people basicly saying that the US had arranged the september 11 attacks on the WTC in 2001. (on the same day, in the US there was this demonstration: http://www.muslimdayparade.com/]muslimdayparade)

There was a request made to ratify a protest march against the islamisation of Europe, which would take place on september 11 2007, partly organised by Vlaams Belang.

This was forbidden by the mayor of Brussels, member of the Parti Socialiste, one of, if not *the* most corrupt post-war Belgian political parties.

Anybody notice an interesting pattern here?


On many of the pictures shown you see the leaders of "Vlaams Belang", who were at the protest even though it was forbidden by the socialist mayor, being arrested by a mostly French speaking police force.

To avoid confusion: I'm a classical liberal, I have no ties or affinnity towards VB, which are fascists in disguise. Anybody who thinks somebody like me would ally with people like that simply doesn't know the first thing about politics and would be better off just shutting up.

Having said that, I believe in freedom of speech as much as I believe in the freedom to breathe, and I say that the banning of this rally shows not only my country but also the rest of the world what freedom of speech in my country is degrading to.

I honestly think that events like these are laying the first stones for a civil war a few decades down the line between native Europeans and muslims who came to live here.

And believe me, it's not something I say lightly.



Anyway, some pictures:

http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?ei=UTF-8&p=Brussels+demonstration&view=grid&fr=&c=images


 
FN Posted: Tue Sep 11 19:39:13 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Related english article:

http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/9AFC7AEF-BE14-4363-BA45-74284B3B618B.htm


 
FN Posted: Tue Sep 11 19:44:56 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  And some other stuff thrown in there to give an idea about the current political climate here

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070911/ap_on_re_eu/belgium_how_to_break_up;_ylt=AnCxXyDmllsHRmDTJKc9t950bBAF


 
FN Posted: Tue Sep 11 19:55:56 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/5414098.stm


 
~Just Imagine~ Posted: Thu Sep 13 06:50:04 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  What you say is correct,
but
I loved, really just loved, the images of the leaders of the flemmish intrest getting arrested...

It made my day, what can I say ...


 
FN Posted: Thu Sep 13 07:42:26 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Well, since they're assholes, I agree that I couldn't stop myself from chuckling either when I first saw it


 
addi Posted: Thu Sep 13 09:39:56 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The right to assemble and protest is a source of tension most true democracies have to wrestle with. I know here we have deal with it when, for example, the KKK wants the "right" to rally at some event. You hate what they stand for, but want to preserve their right to assemble...as long as it's peaceful.

I have my own opinion on any demands a religious minority (in a free state)can justifiably make on a government.
Because they have chosen to live in said country I believe they are obligated to respect, to a certain extent, the cultural values of that place.
If a "liberated" American female lives in Saudi Arabia I think she needs to respect the long standing religious practice of dressing appropriately in public...meaning the authorities would have the right to insist she not parade around exposing her goods in a micro-mini and low cut top in public. It boils down to common sense really, and respecting the mores and values of where you choose to live.
By the same token, I don't believe that muslims living in european countries have a leg to stand on when they start demanding that laws must be made to reflect their particular religious customs. If a certain western cultural practice is so vile and horrific to them then they need to move back to a Islamic country more in line with their beliefs...pretty simple really.
Acceptance and tolerance of certain ethnic minorities cultural differences is important I think. If muslim women feel comfortable covering up then let them do it. Likewise muslims living here or in europe have no business demanding that the customs of the majority be changed to meet their idea of what's acceptable and what isn't.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Sep 13 23:00:22 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>The right to assemble and protest is a source of tension most true democracies have to wrestle with. I know here we have deal with it when, for example, the KKK wants the "right" to rally at some event. You hate what they stand for, but want to preserve their right to assemble...as long as it's peaceful.
>
>I have my own opinion on any demands a religious minority (in a free state)can justifiably make on a government.
>Because they have chosen to live in said country I believe they are obligated to respect, to a certain extent, the cultural values of that place.
>If a "liberated" American female lives in Saudi Arabia I think she needs to respect the long standing religious practice of dressing appropriately in public...meaning the authorities would have the right to insist she not parade around exposing her goods in a micro-mini and low cut top in public. It boils down to common sense really, and respecting the mores and values of where you choose to live.
>By the same token, I don't believe that muslims living in european countries have a leg to stand on when they start demanding that laws must be made to reflect their particular religious customs. If a certain western cultural practice is so vile and horrific to them then they need to move back to a Islamic country more in line with their beliefs...pretty simple really.
>Acceptance and tolerance of certain ethnic minorities cultural differences is important I think. If muslim women feel comfortable covering up then let them do it. Likewise muslims living here or in europe have no business demanding that the customs of the majority be changed to meet their idea of what's acceptable and what isn't.
>
YEAH !
What he said !


 
Mesh Posted: Sun Sep 16 04:33:43 2007 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>addi said:
>>The right to assemble and protest is a source of tension most true democracies have to wrestle with. I know here we have deal with it when, for example, the KKK wants the "right" to rally at some event. You hate what they stand for, but want to preserve their right to assemble...as long as it's peaceful.
>>
>>I have my own opinion on any demands a religious minority (in a free state)can justifiably make on a government.
>>Because they have chosen to live in said country I believe they are obligated to respect, to a certain extent, the cultural values of that place.
>>If a "liberated" American female lives in Saudi Arabia I think she needs to respect the long standing religious practice of dressing appropriately in public...meaning the authorities would have the right to insist she not parade around exposing her goods in a micro-mini and low cut top in public. It boils down to common sense really, and respecting the mores and values of where you choose to live.
>>By the same token, I don't believe that muslims living in european countries have a leg to stand on when they start demanding that laws must be made to reflect their particular religious customs. If a certain western cultural practice is so vile and horrific to them then they need to move back to a Islamic country more in line with their beliefs...pretty simple really.
>>Acceptance and tolerance of certain ethnic minorities cultural differences is important I think. If muslim women feel comfortable covering up then let them do it. Likewise muslims living here or in europe have no business demanding that the customs of the majority be changed to meet their idea of what's acceptable and what isn't.
>>
>YEAH !
>What he said !



Indeed. I'm so sick of that bullshit. They're only going to make it bad for themselves. Rightwing parties in Europe certainly aren't getting any less popular amongst the white european peoples....


 



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