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Fortnight
mat_j Posted: Wed Apr 20 06:11:59 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Is that term funny to anyone in here, i've just discovered that the word fortnight is funny to Americans, what's wrong with fortnight?

Fortnight.


 
Kira Posted: Wed Apr 20 08:10:49 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  It's not funny to me but I'm an atheist Libertarian autodidact.... not exactly your average American.


 
Kira Posted: Wed Apr 20 08:25:06 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Granted I know better than to use the word if I don't want to distract people with my weirdness. Like when I resist using the word 'queer' with its original meaning of 'weird' because if I'm trying to convey something it just complicates things unnecessarily.


 
choke Posted: Wed Apr 20 08:36:34 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  This is lost on me.

ENLIGHTEN


 
libra Posted: Wed Apr 20 12:55:09 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Yes, we think fortnight is funny.
I like it, though. It reminds me of books - Anne of Green Gables, the Chronicles of Narnia, etc.

My brother was planning on going to study abroad in Australia and my mom was reading the rules about paying fees/rent and stuff and it had the word fortnight in it, and we all giggled.




 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Apr 20 14:49:11 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  It doesn't sound funny to me, it just sounds really old, like from Shakespearian times. It's not a word you hear often in America.


 
choke Posted: Wed Apr 20 18:51:17 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Wow, that's so cool!


 
mat_j Posted: Thu Apr 21 03:18:24 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ah New Zealand the geekiest country in the new world, i knew you'd stick by your crazy old uncle Britain.


Shakespearean eh?

I use the word fortnight more or less every day.

I love this, this is exciting to me, what other British words are funny to you?

Now if you'll excuse me I'm going to parambulate to the petrol station to get an omnibus.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Apr 21 05:54:13 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  America and England are two countries separated by a common language - George Bernard Shaw.

That is a very accurate statement.


 
Kira Posted: Thu Apr 21 09:11:44 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  "Boot" for a car trunk is the one I find funny. Perhaps if I knew how it came to be called that it wouldn't seem so odd to me.


 
mat_j Posted: Thu Apr 21 10:24:08 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Very true hiffer! good ol GBS!!

I like Americanisms and am not one to bemoan their use even Aks (which might i add is a perfectly legitimate way of saying ask and the word swings back and forth across the centuries, being one or t'other as the ages go by. Chaucer for example uses 'aks' in his Canterbury tales).

I will not abide the curious way you say aluminium tho(ugh) (aloominum instead of al-u-min-ee-um) which is correct ;-)

Trunk is funny to us, though i guess it probably relates to trunks being kept on carriages, i have no idea why it's called a boot.

Also petrol being called gas which i never got because it's in a liquid form.

I always get excited when i find out a new one of these.

my favourite words we use and you don't are trousers and knickers both of which sound kinda lame to me too.




 
libra Posted: Thu Apr 21 13:11:34 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I like the words trousers and knickers.

The thing I noticed most when I was in London last summer was not so much specific words, but the structure in which public statements are made.

Things like "mind the gap" sound kind of hesitant and polite compared to the american "watch your step" (or, actually, we don't even warn people about the 'gap' on train systems - we just let them fend for themselves).

There were a few other signs and phrases that I noticed that were similar - like at construction sites. There's this kind of "we're going to be so overly polite about this that you won't feel that you can say anything or complain about it" thing about it.
I don't know if this is necessarily true, but that's kind of what I gathered from my very limited time there (I REALLY want to go back, BTW. I'm itchin' to go traveling again.)





 
ifihadahif Posted: Thu Apr 21 13:25:54 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I grew up using the word trousers, and it seems it fell out of favor in the 60's.
We also used the word skivvies which I am guessing almost no one in GT has ever used.


 
Posted: Fri Apr 22 03:52:51 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  of course, fortnight! my favourite night of the week, the night of forts.


 
choke Posted: Fri Apr 22 21:02:28 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>of course, fortnight! my favourite night of the week, the night of forts.

LOL.

And hif, I use skivvy. It's a long sleeved light close fitting top, no idea what it is in the rest of the world! What word do other people use for it?

Matt, yay geekiness and Uncle Britain! Although he'd be shocked if he found the amount of "bro's" in our language. (Not to be confused with American bro, this has a different connotation) I even call my sister bro. I.e. To express shock/empathy or disgust - "Bro."

One word I am curious about in the rest of the world, it has become my pet hate, actually.

In your countries, does "emasculate" mean "to make masculine" or "remove ones masculinity"?

I've learnt it has the "remove" meaning (although I heard that from an American), I don't know what the meaning is in NZ English because noone uses big words, but I feel deeply in my heart of hearts that it should mean to MAKE MASCULINE. Wouldn't that fit the formula of adding "em" to the beginning of a word - I.e "empower"? Wouldn't to remove masculinity be something like "demasculate" or "immasculate"? (Although I think immasculate would be more a state of being, like they can never become masculine - sortof like immortal) Am I alone in this? Have I just proved MatJ right and made all of you never want to come to NZ unless you catch the geek?


 
choke Posted: Fri Apr 22 21:23:34 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Also (Probably most likely directed at Uncle Britain but anyone is free to answer)

I have a sweet sweet calender of forgotten English, and I wish to share this gem with you. Don't look it up online and see if you can guess what it means! (It's awesome you're going to love it, I'm trying to bring it back as a common usage so tell all your friends)

"Sporting ivory"


 
choke Posted: Fri Apr 22 21:25:29 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  The worst thing about drive-by posting is there's never anyone around to reply to you :(


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Apr 22 22:15:16 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
>CriminalSaint said:
>>of course, fortnight! my favourite night of the week, the night of forts.
>
>LOL.
>
>And hif, I use skivvy. It's a long sleeved light close fitting top, no idea what it is in the rest of the world! What word do other people use for it?
>
Skivvies are mens underwear.

Sporting ivory. Is that like getting wood ?


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 23 04:25:35 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>>
>Skivvies are mens underwear.
>
>Sporting ivory. Is that like getting wood ?

Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaatttt

Does anyone else use skivvies as an item of light sweaterish clothing? Like a thermal?



And nope, guess again!


 
Kira Posted: Sat Apr 23 10:39:53 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Does it have anything to do with smiling?


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 23 22:12:13 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>Does it have anything to do with smiling?

YES

To sport ivory - show teeth - SMILE.

I'm getting this back into common usage, HELP ME. Go sport some ivory with your friends!


 
mat_j Posted: Mon Apr 25 15:33:49 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  skivvies are what we call crackers, kegs or if you're a cockney 'insects and ants' aka (Under) pants.

Bonnet and hood is another car related one.

car park and parking lot

Spanner and wrench

windscreen and windshield



As i research this it gets even more interesting, so you're not keen on the 24 hour clock and we don't specify the denomination of the lower coin value when stating the price.

e.g

3 dollars and 30 cents

Five pounds fifty.

And what's more apparently you say To-may-to and we say to-mah-to!

God lord, let's call the whole thing off*

*Whatever the fuck that means.





 
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Apr 25 17:59:28 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>skivvies are what we call crackers, kegs or if you're a cockney 'insects and ants' aka (Under) pants.
>
>Bonnet and hood is another car related one.
>
>car park and parking lot
>
>Spanner and wrench
>
>windscreen and windshield
>
>
>
>As i research this it gets even more interesting, so you're not keen on the 24 hour clock and we don't specify the denomination of the lower coin value when stating the price.
>
>e.g
>
>3 dollars and 30 cents
>
>Five pounds fifty.
>
>And what's more apparently you say To-may-to and we say to-mah-to!
>
>God lord, let's call the whole thing off*
>
>*Whatever the fuck that means.
>
We sat bathroom instead of watercloset.



 
Ahriman Posted: Mon Apr 25 21:48:55 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ummmm...We call it pop not soda. Sucker not a lollipop. Buffalonians don't refer to our interstates as such they are simply "the". The 90, the 219, the 400. "You take the 90 to the 33, then got off at the Scajaquada." It's a crick not a creek. Hydro here is only referenced with the power plant by the Falls. Chicken wings are "wings", nobody calls them "Buffalo wings". I could get into the individual slang from the different neighborhoods but a lot of 'em are pretty stereotypical so if you watched enough movies/shows then you got it. Yadda yadda yadda.

Happy Dyngus Day GTers :D


 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Tue Apr 26 08:03:33 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>I will not abide the curious way you say aluminium tho(ugh) (aloominum instead of al-u-min-ee-um) which is correct ;-)

I've been trying to tell Puck that for years now.... He doesn't believe me x___x!

>my favourite words we use and you don't are trousers and knickers both of which sound kinda lame to me too.

I am actually rather fond of the word trousers. Not sure why but I am.


ifihadahif said:
>We also used the word skivvies which I am guessing almost no one in GT has ever used.

I've actually used that word many times :) I'm pretty weird though :/


I started randomly using "British" terms for everyday things. It isn't a conscious decision though, just two days ago I rattled out an announcement full of British terms that confused Puck to no end. I didn't even realize that I was using the terms until I looked over and saw the look of "umm what?" on Puck's face XD

This is what happens when the only television and radio programs I watch and listen to are those by the BBC.

I have to say that I'm quite smitten with Great Britain as a whole. :D

If it was a person then I would run off and have a passionate love affair with it :P


 
mat_j Posted: Tue Apr 26 10:32:19 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>We sat bathroom instead of watercloset.
>

Common misconception this one, we rarely saw watercloset or WC anymore, for at least the last 20 years the 'Gents', 'ladies', 'lavatory' (Or more often just lav) or simply the 'toilet' are far more commonly used, i think your average British child would think you were funny in the head if you asked about a watercloset.



C'moon, i would expect nothing less from you!!



 
Ahriman Posted: Tue Apr 26 12:32:39 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>We sat bathroom instead of watercloset.
>>
>
>Common misconception this one, we rarely saw watercloset or WC anymore, for at least the last 20 years the 'Gents', 'ladies', 'lavatory' (Or more often just lav) or simply the 'toilet' are far more commonly used, i think your average British child would think you were funny in the head if you asked about a watercloset.


Not too many catholes then?


 
misszero Posted: Wed Apr 27 11:06:24 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  With you on skivvies, choke, must be an antipodean thing.

and mat, that song's been haunting me the past day... 'let's call the whole thing off' i mean


 
mat_j Posted: Thu Apr 28 02:48:58 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  misszero said:
>With you on skivvies, choke, must be an antipodean thing.
>
>and mat, that song's been haunting me the past day... 'let's call the whole thing off' i mean

You Antipodeans and your long sleeved light close fitting tops!!




 
Puck Posted: Wed May 11 15:44:54 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>Bonnet and hood is another car related one.
When I hear bonnet, there's always a quick moment of "huh?! Oh... yeah."

>And what's more apparently you say To-may-to and we say to-mah-to!
I think I brought that one up once.


 
Puck Posted: Wed May 11 15:48:25 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Cherry_Moon said:
>I rattled out an announcement full of British terms that confused Puck to no end. I didn't even realize that I was using the terms until I looked over and saw the look of "umm what?" on Puck's face

I was disturbed, not confused. The look was "seriously? you're gonna go with THAT?"


 
Puck Posted: Wed May 11 15:54:13 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ahriman said:
>We call it pop not soda.

I used to call it pop, then switched to soda in high school. Soda just sounds more dignified.


 
Cherry_Moon Posted: Sat May 14 17:22:16 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>I was disturbed, not confused. The look was "seriously? you're gonna go with THAT?"

Psha. I'm awesome and you know it. :P


 
Kira Posted: Sun May 15 22:54:00 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I remember actually saying fortnight once during a conversation with a coworker. She actually interrupted me there to ask "What?" and I had to clarify that I meant two weeks. Fourteen nights. Fortnight.

Sheesh.

By now I have a reputation at work for being something of an odd duck.


 
Puck Posted: Fri Jun 17 14:27:46 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  At work today, some old guy asked me how to get to the post office because he'd only been in town for a fortnight.



 
mat_j Posted: Thu Jun 30 09:27:14 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  D'ya reckon people in more historically English/British areas like New England might use it more?

It's really a cracking word and i encourage more of your to use it.




 
Kira Posted: Fri Jul 1 20:31:34 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Oh! This thread coming up again has inspired me to teach this word to my kids at the Boys Club. I'll make it one of the Hangman words! Ha!


 
choke Posted: Sun Jul 3 18:53:12 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Lol it cracks me up that it's like, a quaint oddity everywhere else in the world


 
Puck Posted: Sun Jul 3 23:17:44 2011 Post | Quote in Reply  
  choke said:
>Lol it cracks me up that it's like, a quaint oddity everywhere else in the world

It so is. I demanded high-fives from everyone nearby, after he left


 



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