THE X-FILES
Shapes (1x18)

written by Marilyn Osborn


episodes

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All Things
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Requiem

Fight The Future

MULDER: Then who or what do you think was responsible?

JIM PARKER: Look, mister. That cow looked like a piece of paper that had gone through a shredder. I don't know of no animal that could have done that.

MULDER: Then are you saying that a person or persons was responsible for this?


JIM PARKER: All I'm saying, it was no kind of animal that I know of. But it damn well didn't seem human neither, that night. Take a look at my boy's scars. It was dark, we heard a growl and we went out there to protect the cattle. I could have swore I saw ... red eyes and fangs.


LYLE PARKER: For the last few months, whenever we'd go outside at night and check on the cattle - never saw anything out of the ordinary. Not a mountain lion, not a coyote, not even any Tregos, Agent Scully. But I could feel it. Something not human ... out there ... watching me. The air was more still, the night animals more quiet. It was like nature herself was terrified. It gave me the creeps.


SCULLY: Well, there seems to be nothing unexplainable about this case.

MULDER: Nope. Not a thing.


ISH: Go home, FBI.

MULDER: How'd you know?

ISH: I could smell you a mile away.

MULDER: Well, they told me that even though my deodorant's made for a woman, it's strong enough for a man.


ISH: I was at Wounded Knee in 1973. What I learned fighting the FBI is you don't believe in us and we don't believe in you.

MULDER: I want to believe.


SHERIFF TSKANY: No. I can't let you do an autopsy. The funeral is tonight.

MULDER: It's a cremation. After that, we'll have nothing.

SHERIFF TSKANY: Tregoes believe that the recent dead are unsettled by their new condition as spirits. Any desecration of the body angers the spirit and keeps it haunting this world.

SCULLY: But you're a law enforcement officer. You can't destroy evidence.

SHERIFF TSKANY: Don't tell me what I can't do. Native Americans believe that their law is greater and more just than that of the U.S. government.


MULDER: A true piece of history, Scully. The very first X-file, initiated by J. Edgar Hoover himself in 1946. During World War II, a series of murders occurred in and around the northwest, seven here in Browning alone. Each victim was basically ripped to shreds and eaten, as if by a wild animal. However, many of the victims were found at home, as if they allowed their killer to enter. In 1946, police cornered what they believed to be such an animal in a cabin in Glacier National Park. They shot it, but when they went in to retrieve the carcass, they found only the body of Richard Watkins.

SCULLY: Sounds like the Parker scenario.

MULDER: The murders stopped that year. Because the cases were unsolved and considered so bizarre, Hoover locked them away, hoping that in time people around here would forget about them.

SCULLY: This file indicates that they started again in 1954.

MULDER: In '59, '64, '78 and now again in '94. But...

SCULLY: Here it comes.

MULDER: ...these animal-man related murders predate the oldest X-file by 150 years. Members of the Lewis and Clark expedition wrote of Indian men who could change their shape into that of a wolf.

SCULLY: Mulder, what this, what this folder describes is called lycanthropy. It's a type of insanity in which an individual believes that he can turn into a wolf. I mean, no one can physically change into an animal.


MULDER: I read the report of your investigation into the Goodensnake homicide. It was very good, thorough, professional. But what I want to know is off the record. What do you think really happened?

SHERIFF TSKANY: Your explanation, Agent Mulder, is lying on that burial platform. Why don't you just accept that and go home?

MULDER: Charlie, do you believe in shape-shifting?

SHERIFF TSKANY: This is a funeral.

GWEN GOODENSNAKE: Get out of here!

LYLE PARKER: Please, I just want to show my respects.

GWEN GOODENSNAKE: I don't want your respects. I want your heart to grow cold. I want you to feel what I'm feeling.


LYLE PARKER: I can deal with death, you know, living on the ranch, being close to nature and all, you see how it all works. Things are born, things die, everything else falls in between.


ISH: I sense you are different, FBI. You're more open to Native American belief than some Native Americans. You even have an Indian name - Fox. You should be "Running Fox", or "Sneaky Fox".

MULDER: Just as long as it's not "Spooky Fox".


ISH: Watkins had been attacked by an animal when he was alone in the woods. His scars healed. He was forgotten, then the murders began. The Tregoes, we realized that Watkins had been attacked by what the Algonquins called the manitou ... an evil spirit capable of changing a man into a beast. To be attacked by a manitou causes the victim to become one.


ISH: A manitou overtakes a man by night, not by full moon. But when its blood lust builds to an uncontrollable level, a man changes to a sickening creature. It kills, releasing the savage energy. The man returns to his true self, unaware of what has happened. The cycle begins anew the next day. This continues until death. One night, when I was 16 years old, I was coming back from fishing at the Cut Bank Creek. I knew a shortcut behind Watkins' house. There was a groan, not animal but not human. I looked into his window. He was covered in sweat and blood. He was in a great, great pain. His arm - the skin ripped. It tore up and fell to the floor. Claws sprang from his fingernails. He turned, screaming, and he saw me. His eyes ... his eyes were still human.


ISH: FBI! See you in about... eight years.

MULDER: I hope not.



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Copyright (c) Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation


taken from the X-Files transcript by Dave Fox - davefox@richmond.infi.net